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PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 9:55 pm 
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January 1, 1862 Wednesday
At Provincetown, Massachusetts on Cape Cod four men boarded the British sloop of war Rinaldo en route to Halifax and Europe. The imprisoned Confederate commissioners Mason and Slidell and their secretaries had left Fort Warren in Boston Harbor after the Federal government had acceded to British demands for their release. The Trent Affair was finished, but it left a bad taste.

Presidents Lincoln and Davis opened the new year with traditional receptions. In Washington all the Cabinet members, diplomatic corps, justices, and army and navy officers attended, as well as the public. One guest, an Illinois politician, had his pocket picked of more than $50 in gold.

In Richmond bands played and thousands grasped President Davis’ hand at the door of his reception room.

President Lincoln, though, had problems trying to get Gen Halleck from St Louis and Cairo and Gen Buell from Louisville to cooperate “in concert” in drives on Nashville, Tennessee and Columbus, Kentucky. The General-in-Chief, George B. McClellan, remained ill. President Lincoln writes to Gen McClellan regarding the general's "uneasiness" about "the doings" of Congress's Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War ( http://www.examiner.com/military-histor ... 25-31-1861 ). Lincoln explains, "You may be entirely relieved . . . The gentlemen of the Committee were with me an hour and a half last night; and I found them in a perfectly good mood. As their investigation brings them acquainted with facts, they are rapidly coming to think of the whole case as all sensible men would."

In Pensacola, Florida the new year was welcomed by a bombardment by Federals on shipping and on Fort Barrancas, and by Confederates on Fort Pickens. Dayton, Missouri was virtually destroyed during a skirmish. Stonewall Jackson led a Confederate force toward Romney, western Virginia.

Navy squadron under Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, including gunboats Ottawa, Pembina, and Seneca and four armed boats carrying howitzers, joined General Stevens' troops in successful amphibious attack on Confederate positions at Port Royal Ferry and on Coosaw River. Gunboat fire covered the troop advance, and guns and naval gunners were landed as artillery support. Army signal officers acted as gunfire observers and coordinators on board the ships. The action disrupted Confederate plans to erect batteries and build troop strength in the area intending to close Coosaw River and isolate Federal troops on Port Royal Island. General Stevens wrote: "I would do great injustice to my own feelings did I fail to express my satisfaction and delight with the recent cooperation of the command of Captain Rodgers in our celebration of New Year's Day. Whether regard be had to his beautiful working of the gunboats in the narrow channel of Port Royal, the thorough concert of action established through the signal officers, or the masterly handling of the guns against the enemy, nothing remained to be desired. Such a cooperation . . . augurs everything. propitious for the welfare of our cause in this quarter of the country."

U.S.S. Yankee, commanded by Lieutenant Eastman, and U.S.S. Anacostia, Lieutenant Oscar C. Badger, exchanged fire with Confederate batteries at Cockpit Point, Potomac River; Yankee was damaged slightly. Attacks by ships of the Potomac Flotilla were instrumental in forcing the withdrawal of strong Confederate emplacements along the river. Batteries at Cockpit and Shipping Point were abandoned by 9 March 1862.

Flag Officer Foote reported to Secretary of the Navy Welles that he was sending U.S.S. Lexington, commanded by Lieutenant Shirk, to join U.S.S. Conestoga, commanded by Lieutenant S. L. Phelps, which had been rendering valuable service in her river cruising ground, protecting "Union people" on the borders of the Ohio River and its tributaries; indeed, the control of the rivers advanced Union frontiers deep into territory sympathetic to the South. Foote added: "I am using all possible dispatch in getting all the gunboats ready for service. There is great demand for them in different places in the western rivers."

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2012 8:16 pm 
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January 2, 1862 Thursday
The President learned Gen McClellan was very much improved, but not yet back on duty leading the Federal land armies. In the South the Memphis Argus, like many Confederate papers, was beginning to ask why the soldiers were not used and to complain of taxes.

Flag Officer L. M. Goldsborough ordered U.S.S. Louisiana, Lockwood, I. N. Seymour, Shawsheen, and Whitehall (forced to return to Newport News because of engine trouble) to Hatteras Inlet, "using a sound discretion in time of departing." Goldsborough wrote Secretary of the Navy Welles the next day: " When they arrive there, twelve of this squadron will have been assembled in that quarter. With the rest we are driving on as fast as possible." Since early December extensive preparations for the joint attack on Roanoke Island--the key to Albemarle Sound--had been underway in a move not only to seal off the North Carolina coast, but also to back up General McClellan's Peninsular Campaign by threatening Confederate communications.

Flag Officer Foote wrote Secretary of the Navy Welles: . "I hope to be able to send 60 men on board of each gunboat within the week. We are waiting for the 1,000 men to fill up our complement . . . The carpenters and engineers are behind in their work." Eads" completion of the gunboats had been much delayed beyond his contract time. This placed a great strain upon the wooden gunboats, whose daily service in the rivers was demonstrated by General Grant's typical communication with Foote: "Will you please direct a gunboat to drop down the river . . . to protect a steamer I am sending down to bring up produce for some loyal citizens of Kentucky?"

Steamer Ella Warley evaded U.S.S. Mohican, under Commander Godon, in a heavy fog and ran the blockade into Charleston.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 8:21 pm 
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January 3, 1862 Friday
Stonewall Jackson was on the march despite winter weather. From Winchester, Virginia he had moved north January 1st on what is often called the Romney Campaign. There was a brief skirmish at Bath, western Virginia. Jackson’s purpose was to break up the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and destroy dams on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. In December he had struck Dam No 5 and now was aiming at more depredations. There was also action at Huntersville, western Virginia and a Federal reconnaissance near Big Bethel, Virginia and a naval bombardment at Cockpit Point, Virginia ( http://www.americancivilwar.com/statepic/va/va100.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Cockpit_Point ) as well as a skirmish at Hunnewell, Missouri. President Davis, aware of Federal troops on Ship Island, Mississippi realized the movement “no doubt is intended against Mobile or New Orleans,” in writing the governor of Mississippi. President Lincoln transmits to the Senate a treaty with the tribe of Potawatomi Indians. At 8 P.M. President Lincoln attends the fifth lecture by Horace Greeley at the Smithsonian. He occupies a seat on the platform and discourtesy toward the President is exhibited by the Fremont clique that is present.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:40 pm 
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January 4, 1862 Saturday
As Jackson’s Confederates entered and occupied Bath, western Virginia, there were other skirmishes in the soon-to-be state at Slane’s Cross Roads, Great Cacapon Bridge, Sir John’s Run, and Alpine Depot. President Lincoln as President and really temporary General-in-Chief, vice the ill McClellan, inquired of Gen Buell in Kentucky as to the progress of his much desired movement toward and into east Tennessee. Buell somewhat doubted the wisdom of the move, and at times appeared to neglect it.

Here is a look at the war in January 1862 from Springfield, Massachusetts ( http://www.masslive.com/history/index.s ... r_day.html ).

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 9:14 pm 
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January 5, 1862 Sunday
Stonewall Jackson’s Confederates, moving from Bath, western Virginia to the Potomac opposite Hancock, Maryland pursued the retiring Federals and bombarded the town for two days without receiving a surrender or making a crossing. For a week there were Federal operations in Johnston and La Fayette counties of Missouri with a skirmish at Columbus, Missouri.

Flag Officer L. M. Goldsborough, replying to a telegram from Brigadier General Ambrose E. Burnside, the Army commander for the Roanoke Island expedition, wrote that "the sooner you start your first brigade [for Hatteras Inlet] the better, and so, too, with all vessels you have which are to be towed or which require choice weather in order to arrive, safely." President Lincoln was reported as "anxious to hear of the departure of the expedition."

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 9:47 pm 
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January 6, 1862 Monday
President Lincoln conferred with Gen McClellan, recovering from what has been called typhoid fever; and wrote Gen Buell in Kentucky of his distress over “our friends in East Tennessee,” urging, without ordering, military advance in the area. The Cabinet meets at 7:30 P.M. at request of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. President Lincoln rejects the demand of Sen. Wade (Ohio) for the removal of McClellan. One of Flag Officer Foote's primary problems was the manning of the new ironclad gunboats, which were becoming available behind contract date at St. Louis and Mound City. The Navy Department sent a draft of 500 seamen; the rest had to be recruited or detailed from the Army. That the Army was reluctant to give up its best men for service afloat was demonstrated by Grant's letter to Major General Halleck, in which he wrote that he had a number of offenders in the guardhouse and suggested, "In view of the difficulties of getting men for the gunboat service, that these men be transferred to that service . . ." Henry Heth, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General. Brig Gen Schuyler Hamilton, USA, assumes command of the St. Louis District, in Missouri.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 6:44 pm 
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January 7, 1862 Tuesday
Jackson’s forces, turning from Hancock, Maryland moved toward Romney, western Virginia, away from the Potomac, with fighting at Hanging Rock Pass or Blue’s Gap. In the eastern Kentucky operations, there was a skirmish near Paintsville and another at Jennie’s Creek, as Federals moved slowly forward. The Federal Department of North Carolina was constituted and would be commanded by Brig Gen Ambrose E. Burnside. Johnson Kelly Duncan, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

Lieutenant S. L. Phelps, commanding the U.S.S. Conestoga, on an expedition up the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers gained valuable intelligence about Confederate activity at Forts Henry and Donelson. "The rebels," he reported to Flag Officer Foote, "are industriously perfecting their means of defense both at Dover and Fort Henry. At Fort Donelson (near Dover) they have placed obstructions in the river, 1 1/2 miles below their battery, on the left bank and in the bend where the battery comes in sight . . . The fire of gunboats here [at Fort Donelson] would be at a bad angle . . . The forts are placed, especially on the Cumberland, where no great range can be had, and they can only be attacked in one narrow and fixed line . . . It is too late now "to move against the works on either river, except with a well-appointed and powerful naval force." As early as mid-December 1861, Phelps had reconnoitered the Cumberland and warned of the immense difficulties involved in a naval assault on Fort Donelson, the strategically located Confederate stronghold. "None of the works can be seen," he observed, "till approached to within easy range." The difficult assault on Fort Donelson five weeks later gave truth to Phelps' careful observation. Meanwhile, Flag Officer Foote reconnoitered down the Mississippi with U.S.S. Tyler, Lexington, and Essex, the latter one of the first two ironclads ready. Pursuing a Confederate gunboat, Foote proceeded within range of the batteries at Columbus and found "one of the submarine batteries.". But learning that the river was generally clear of these, he was able to report that "my object was fully attained."

General McClellan's orders to Brigadier General Burnside illustrated the Army's reliance on strength afloat: ". . . you will," he wrote, "after uniting with Flag-Officer Goldsborough at Fort Monroe, proceed under his convoy to Hatteras Inlet . . . [the] first point of attack will be Roanoke Island and its dependencies. It is presumed that the Navy can reduce the batteries . . . and cover the landing of your troops . . ." McClellan also detailed the Army's follow-up operations in conjunction with the gunboats at Fort Macon, New Bern, and Beaufort.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2012 9:56 pm 
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January 8, 1862 Wednesday
Federals routed a Confederate camp at Roan’s Tan-Yard on Silver Creek, Missouri ( http://timelines.com/1862/1/8/battle-of-roans-tan-yard ) while there was another skirmish at Charleston, Missouri and a minor affair on the Dry Fork of Cheat River, western Virginia. Near Somerset on Fishing Creek, Kentucky there was a small skirmish, and as the armies were gathering in the area it presaged more to come. President Davis continued to correspond with the various governors, including Claiborne Jackson of Missouri, trying to persuade them that their states were not neglected and that the Confederacy needed manpower. President Lincoln converses at length with Gen James Shields, who once challenged him to a duel in Springfield. White House requests loan of "Halleck's Science of War" from Library of Congress.

General Robert E. Lee, confounded by the strength and mobility of the Union Navy, observed. " Wherever his fleet can be brought no opposition to his landing can be made except within range of our fixed batteries. We have nothing to oppose to its heavy guns, which sweep over the low banks of this country with irresistible force. The farther he can be withdrawn from his floating batteries the weaker he will become, and lines of defense, covering objects of attack, have been selected with this view."

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 8:59 pm 
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January 9, 1862 Thursday
President Lincoln informed Gen McClellan that neither of the commanders in the West, Halleck or Buell, had met the President’s request to name a day when they would be ready to move. At Cairo, Illinois, however, Grant was preparing a reconnaissance in force into Kentucky toward Columbus. There was a brief skirmish near Columbus, and another near Pohick Run, Virginia. Orders went out in St Louis to have a copy of each newspaper daily sent to the provost marshal general for inspection. That city’s Chamber of Commerce was disrupted by withdrawal of pro-Union members. In the Congress of the United States petitions were continually being issued calling for an end to slavery, and members on the floor were suggesting emancipation, colonization of Negroes, and compensation to owners. Col Francis J. Lippitt, 2nd California Infantry, USA, assumes command of the Humboldt Military District, California. John George Walker, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

Orders from the Navy Department appointed Flag Officer Farragut to command Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, flagship U.S.S. Hartford, then at Philadelphia. The bounds of the command extended from West Florida to the Rio Grande, but a far larger purpose than even the important function of blockade lay behind Farragut's appointment. Late in 1861 the administration had made a decision that would have fateful results on the war. The full list of senior officers in the Navy was reviewed for a commander for an enterprise of first importance--the capture of New Orleans, the South's "richest and most populous city," and the beginning of the drive of sea-based power up the Father of Waters to meet General Grant, who would soon move south behind the spearhead of the armored gunboats. On 21 December 1861, in Washington, Farragut had written his wife: " Keep your lips closed, and burn my letters; for perfect silence is to be observed--the first injunction of the Secretary. I am to have a flag in the Gulf and the rest depends upon myself. Kccp calm and silent. I shall sail in three wceks." Meanwhile, the tight blockade was causing grave concern in New Orleans. The Commercial Bulletin reported: "The situation of this port makes it a matter of vast moment to the whole Confederate State that it should be opened to the commerce of the world within the least possible period . . .We believe the blockading vessels of the enemy might have been driven away and kept away months ago, if the requisite energy had been put forth . . . The blockade has remained and the great port of New Orleans has been hermetically scaled . . ."

Beginning on December 24, 1861, and lasting for 45 days, the largest flood in California's recorded history was created, reaching full flood stage in different areas between January 9-12, 1862. The entire Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys were inundated for an extent of 300 miles (480 km), averaging 20 miles (32 km) in breadth. State government was forced to relocate from the capital in Sacramento for 18 months in San Francisco. The rain created an inland sea in Orange County, lasting about three weeks with water standing 4 feet (1.2 m) deep up to 4 miles (6 km) from the river. The Los Angeles basin was flooded from the San Gabriel Mountains to the Palos Verdes Peninsula, at variable depths, excluding the higher lands which became islands until the waters receded. The Los Angeles basin lost 200,000 cattle by way of drowning, as well as homes, ranches, farm crops and vineyards being swept-away.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2012 10:28 pm 
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January 10, 1862 Friday
Grant’s Federal troops in the cold and damp left the Cairo, Illinois area and moved toward Columbus, Kentucky. Meant largely as a diversionary action to take attention from Union operations toward east Tennessee, Grant led his men on a dreary, wearisome march with little fighting. By January 21st they were back in Cairo, mission accomplished, and a lot learned about winter marching. Farther east in Kentucky, at Middle Creek, near Prestonburg, Federal forces under Brig Gen James A. Garfield advanced against Confederates under Humphrey Marshall ( http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/abpp/battles/ky005.htm ). Garfield was unable to penetrate the Confederate lines or force them back, but after the engagement both sides retreated, and both claimed victory. It was another event in the slow developing Federal drive toward east Tennessee.

In western Virginia, Federals without a fight evacuated Romney in face of Stonewall Jackson’s advance. Confederate troops entered the town and Jackson’s command settled down a bit for the winter. For some time trouble had been a-making between Jackson and one of his commanders, Brig Gen W.W. Loring. Loring and his men contended that Jackson mistreated his army, and eventually Loring went over Jackson’s head to Richmond with his complaint. This resulted in Jackson’s submitting his resignation from the Confederate Army; this was refused and matters were patched up.

In a Confederate command change the Trans-Mississippi District of Department No 2 was set up under command of Maj Gen Earl Van Dorn.

President Lincoln, still anxious over his armies, wrote the Sec of War that he was exceedingly discouraged over the failure to launch an offensive in the West. “As everywhere else, nothing can be done,” he said. At the same time the President was considering the problem of Sec of War Simon Cameron, who had appended a strong anti-slavery statement to his official report without permission. There were repeated charges of corruption in the War Department, and demands for Cameron’s ouster. President summons Gens McDowell and Franklin, Secs Seward and Chase, and Asst Sec Scott to "Council of War" at 8 P.M. In the U.S. Senate Missouri senators Waldo P. Johnson and Trusten Polk, pro-Confederates, were unanimously expelled. The first auction of confiscated cotton from Port Royal, South Carolina was held in New York.

Concern continued to grow in the Union fleet as to what preparations should be taken to meet the unfinished ex-Merrimack. As early as 12 October 1861, Flag Officer L. M. Goldsborough had written Secretary of the Navy Welles: ". . . I am now quite satisfied that . . . she will, in all probability, prove to be exceedingly formidable . . . Nothing, I think, but very close work can possibly be of service in accomplishing the destruction of the Merrimack, and even of that a great deal maybe necessary." Goldsborough ordered tugs Dragon and Zouave to remain constantly in company with U.S.S. Congress and Cumberland, "so as to tow them into an advantageous position in case of an attack from the Merrimack or any other quarter." However, at this date-two months before the historic engagements in Hampton Roads--Union naval commanders were seeking a defense against the powerful Confederate ironclad. under Commander William Smith, captain of the ill-fated Congress, had said earlier, "I have not yet devised any plan to defend us against the Merrimack, unless," he added, "it be with hard knocks."

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:23 pm 
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January 11, 1862 Saturday
A fleet of about a hundred vessels carrying troops under Union Brig Gen Ambrose E. Burnside sailed from Hampton Roads, Virginia for the coast of North Carolina. The navy squadron was under command of Commodore Louis M. Goldsborough. Forces numbered about 15,000 and posed a new threat to the already severely intruded Southern coast. Seizure of Hatteras Inlet by the Navy the previous August allowed Federal control of Pamlico Sound, but heavily fortified Roanoke Island dominated the narrow connection between Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds, the latter of which Confederates used for active blockade running. Capture of strategic Roanoke Island, which one Confederate general termed "that post which I regard as the very key of the rear defenses of Norfolk and the navy yard," would give the Union control of Albemarle Sound and the waters penetrating deeply into North Carolina, over which passed important railroad bridges south of Norfolk. Out west U.S.S. Essex, under Commander W. D. Porter, and U.S.S. St. Louis, commanded by Lieutenant Leonard Paulding, engaged Confederate gunboats in a running fight in the Mississippi River, near Lucas Bend, Missouri ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Lucas_Bend ). The Confederates withdrew under the protecting batteries at Columbus, Kentucky.

In Washington President Lincoln writes two letters to Secretary of War Simon Cameron regarding a new role for Cameron within the administration. In the first letter, Lincoln notes, "As you have, more than once, expressed a desire for a change of position, I can now gratify you." Lincoln plans to nominate Cameron for Minister to Russia. Lincoln labels a second letter, "Private," and in it he confides that the new position will allow Cameron "to render services to your country, not less important than those you could render at home." President Lincoln accepted the public resignation of Sec of War Simon Cameron and indicated that he would name him Minister to Russia. Cameron wrote the President that he had long wished to resign, and the President appeared relieved. But underneath the change were the charges of contract fraud, overactive politics, and incompetence in the management of the War Department. Cameron, while probably reasonably honest personally, was a Pennsylvania politician who could never forget his friends and associations. Few had been satisfied with War Department operations.

President Lincoln calls a second meeting of the "Council of War" from the previous night to discuss the immediate operation of the Army of the Potomac. Brig Gen John Milton Brannan, USA, assumes command of the new Department of Key West, Florida.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:41 pm 
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January 12, 1862 Sunday
From this day to January 23rd the 37th Ohio Infantry carried out an expedition to Logan Court House and the Guyandotte Valley of western Virginia, opposed by Confederate guerrillas.

In Washington, in addition to the shift of the Sec of War, Lincoln had taken action regarding the stalled armies in Virginia by convening a group of major officers about the possibility of a move. McClellan, recovering from illness, surprisingly showed up at the White House, fearful that his command was being undermined. At 1 P.M. convenes another meeting of Gens. McDowell, Franklin, and Meigs, Secs. Seward and Chase, and Postmaster Gen. Blair but adjourns the meeting until tomorrow, when McClellan will be present.

U.S.S. Pensacola, commanded by Captain Henry W. Morris, successfully ran down the Potomac past the Confederate batteries at Cockpit and Shipping Points. Pensacola reached Hampton Roads on 13 January, demonstrating that the restriction of travel on the river, imposed by the Confederate batteries, was being steadily lessened.

This is an excellent short article on the Confederate defense of Tennessee during this time period … http://americancivilwar.com/authors/Jos ... essee.html .

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:56 pm 
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January 13, 1862 Monday
The Federal sea-borne expedition under Brig Gen A.E. Burnside arrived at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina and the general assumed command of the Department of North Carolina, but lack of low-draft vessels and proper landing craft held up his intended invasion.

In Washington it was a busy day for President Lincoln. The Cabinet met in the morning, and the President indicated he would name prominent Washington attorney and former Attorney General under Buchanan Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War. Stanton, a native of Ohio, was to supersede resigned Simon Cameron. At the same time the President sent to the Senate the nomination of Cameron as Minister to Russia replacing legendary Cassius Marcellus Clay. The council of generals, Cabinet members, Lincoln, and McClellan met once more in the afternoon to consider action by the armies. Gen McClellan refused to divulge his plan of operations and apparently resented the interference by the generals and the President. President Lincoln wrote Generals Buell and Halleck in the West concerning military strategy, and states that although his suggestions are not "orders," he would like them to be "respectfully considered." Lincoln offers his assessment of the war: "We have the greater numbers, and the enemy has the greater facility of concentrating forces upon points of collision." Lincoln suggests that the Union forces pressure the enemy "at different points, at the same time; so that we can safely attack, one, or both, if he makes no change."

Lieutenant Worden was ordered to command the U.S.S. Monitor. Three days later Worden wrote Secretary of the Navy Welles from New York: ". . . I have this day reported for duty for the command of the U.S. Steamer building by Captain Ericsson." Within two months, the Monitor, Worden, and Ericsson were to have their names written indelibly in the annals of naval warfare.

Flag Officer Foote ordered three gunboats up the Cumberland River and two up the Tennessee River on demonstrations.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:24 pm 
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January 14, 1862 Tuesday
Forces under Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson enter Romney effectively ending the Romney Campaign ( http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Lor ... n_Incident ). Three Federal gunboats moved down the Mississippi River to near Columbus, Kentucky throwing shells into Confederate encampments. Grant’s reconnaissance into Kentucky operated near Blandville. John Clifford Pemberton, CSA, was appointed to Major General; as John Ring Jackson, CSA, and George Edward Pickett, CSA, were appointed to Brigadier General.

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:02 pm 
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January 15, 1862 Wednesday
The U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment of Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War. Stanton, an energetic, tireless worker, was known to have uttered statements derogatory to President Lincoln. The new Secretary was also known to be a friend of Gen McClellan, and soon he would become one of the most controversial figures of the war. There were, and still are, those who feel he was crafty, dishonest, arbitrary, and unfit for his position. There were, and still are, those who feel that, arbitrary though he was, he was a tower of strength for the Union and for President Lincoln, and that Federal victory owes much to Stanton.

On the Tennessee River a Federal gunboat reconnaissance operated Jan 15th-25th, going almost as far as Fort Henry just below the Kentucky-Tennessee line. The operation was in conjunction with Grant’s overland operations from Cairo. In Missouri there were Federal expeditions to Benton, Bloomfield, and Dallas until the 17th.

Flag Officer Foote advised commanded by Lieutenant Paulding of U.S.S. St. Louis, "I must enjoin you to save your ammunition. No gun must be fired without your order . . - You will be particular in noting the range of the first shot, its height and distance. I was surprised yesterday, at Columbus, to see three or four of your shells bursting at such an elevation . . . I am aware of your difficulties in a new and undisciplined crew and officers, but make these criticisms rather as indicative of correcting things in the future. Save your ammunition and let the first gun show you how to aim for the second." Foote was constantly beset with the problem of having too much to do with too little material, even to the point of being unable to train adequately his crews in gunnery. That he met these difficulties successfully, however, was demonstrated in the Union's steady sweep down the western rivers.

Major General Mansfield Lovell, CSA, at the request of Confederate Secretary of War Benjamin, with the assistance of commanded by Lieutenant Thomas B. Huger, CSN, took over 14 steamers at New Orleans to be armed and used to bolster defenses in the area. The plan which came from the War Department was to outfit the steamships with iron rams to attack the Union river gunboats. Secretary of War Benjamin wrote: "Each Captain will ship his own crew, fit up his own vessel, and get ready within the shortest possible delay. It is not proposed to rely on cannons, which these men are not skilled in using, nor on firearms. The men will be armed with cutlasses. On each boat, however, there will be one heavy gun, to be used in case the stern of any of the [Union] gunboats should be exposed to fire, for they are entirely unprotected behind, and if attempting to escape by flight would be very vulnerable by shot from a pursuing vessel."

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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