ACWGC Forums

American Civil War Game Club

* ACWGC    * Dpt. of Records       * CSA HQ    * VMI   * Join CSA    

* Union HQ   * UMA   * Join Union     ACWGC Memorial

CSA Armies:   ANV   AoT

Union Armies:   AotT    AotC    AotP    AotS     Union Army Forums

Link Express

Club Forums:     NWC    CCC     Home Pages:     NWC    CCC    ACWGC
It is currently Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:16 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 366 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2013 6:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
November 27, 1863 Friday
South of the Rapidan River, Lee moved quickly eastward to block Meade’s new offensive. There was skirmishing at Payne’s Farm, Robertson’s Tavern or Locust Grove, action near New Hope Church, and near Wilderness Church. Meade headed toward the small valley of Mine Run, and Lee strongly posted the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade blamed Maj Gen William Henry French for delaying the attack this day and later termed it a major factor in the failure of the campaign. French’s corps took the wrong road and ran into Early ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Mine_Run ). Fighting also occurred at Catlett’s Station, Virginia.

In the West fighting at Ringgold Gap and Taylor’s Ridge, Georgia wound up the Chattanooga Campaign. Kentucky saw skirmishing at Monticello and La Fayette. Some 280 rounds were fired at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. Grant ordered two divisions under Gordon Grange to rush to the relief of Burnside, besieged by Longstreet in Knoxville. Brigadier General Claudius Charles Wilson ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudius_C._Wilson ), CSA, dies from dysentery at Ringgold, Georgia. U.S.S. Two Sisters, commanded by Acting Master Charles H. Rockwell, seized blockade running schooner Maria Alberta near Bayport, Florida.

John Hunt Morgan and six of his officers, most notably Thomas Hines, escaped from their cells in the Ohio Penitentiary at Columbus, Ohio by digging a tunnel from Hines' cell into the inner yard and then ascending a wall with a rope made from bunk coverlets and a bent poker iron. Morgan and three of his officers, shortly after midnight, boarded a train from the nearby Columbus train station and arrived in Cincinnati that morning. Morgan and Hines jumped from the train before reaching the depot, and escaped into Kentucky by hiring a skiff to take them across the Ohio River. Through the assistance of sympathizers, they eventually made it to safety in the South. Coincidentally, the same day Morgan escaped, his wife gave birth to a daughter, who died shortly afterwards before Morgan returned home.

President Davis, greatly perturbed over Tennessee, advised Bragg to concentrate rapidly, an almost impossible thing to do under the new circumstances.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
November 28, 1863 Saturday
In Virginia Meade probed the strong Confederate positions along Mine Run, with considerable skirmishing. There were more delays because the Federals could not find a spot for a major assault. It was already becoming clear that Lee had halted the Union offensive before it really started.

In the West Sherman and more troops were ordered, along with Granger, to hurry to Burnside at Knoxville. Gen Bragg telegraphed Richmond from Dalton, Georgia, “I deem it due to the cause and to myself to ask for relief from command and investigation into the causes of the defeat.”

A skirmish took place near Molino, Mississippi. Operations against the Memphis and Charleston Railroad in west Tennessee by Forrest’s men lasted until Dec 10.

Between Nov 28 and Dec 4 a total of 1307 shot and shell were fired at Fort Sumter and surrounding batteries around Charleston, South Carolina. Still there was no sign of surrender or evacuation.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 7:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
November 29, 1863 Sunday
In the early dawn Confederates of Gen Longstreet’s command drove at Fort Sanders or Fort Loudon near Knoxville, attempting to break Burnside’s defense lines and take the city before Federal reinforcements could arrive. Against the earthworks the Confederates hurled themselves over the frozen and sleet-covered ground. For a time the Southrons had their flag on the parapet of the fort, but eventually they were forced to withdraw ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Sanders ). It was Longstreet’s last major attempt to penetrate Knoxville. Knowing that Grant was sending reinforcements after the defeat of Bragg, there was little to do but retreat toward Virginia, which he did early in December. Longstreet has often been criticized both for the assault and for the manner in which it was conducted.

In the Mine Run Campaign of Virginia action broke out at Parker’s Store and New Hope Church as Meade, preparing an assault, sought fruitlessly for a weak spot in Lee’s defensive line. Skirmishing occurred also at Brentsville and near Jonesville, Virginia and at Bloomfield, Missouri.

President Lincoln was reported much better following his bout with a mild form of smallpox.

U.S.S. Kanawha, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Mayo, captured schooner Albert (or Wenona) attempting to run the blockade out of Mobile, with cargo of cotton, rosin, turpentine, and tobacco.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2013 9:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
November 30, 1863 Monday
Although it would be another day before Meade gave up along Mine Run in Virginia and retired across the Rapidan River, it was becoming clear that his offensive never would get under way. Corps commander Warren called off an attack because of Lee’s position. Skirmishing continued along the Mine Run lines and at Racoon Ford, as well as at Licking Run Bridge, Virginia.

Elsewhere, action included affairs at Charleston and Yankeetown, Tennessee; and skirmishes at Salyersville, Kentucky; and Port Hudson and Vermillion Bayou, Louisiana. Federal troops moved into Fort Esperanza in Matagorda Bay, Texas. Confederates had evacuated the night before, after skirmishing and siege operations.

In northwest Georgia Bragg gathered together his defeated army and Grant solidified his position around Chattanooga while sending many of his men toward beleaguered Knoxville, Tennessee. From Richmond Gen Samuel Cooper wired Bragg at Dalton, Georgia, “… Your request to be relieved has been submitted to the President, who, upon your representation, directs me to notify you that you are relieved from command, which you will transfer to Lieutenant-General Hardee….”

Secretary Mallory emphasized the necessity for the proper training of naval officers in his annual report on the Confederate States Navy. It was, he wrote, "a subject of the greatest importance." He observed: "The naval powers of the earth are bestowing peculiar care upon the education of their officers, now more than ever demanded by the changes in all the elements of naval warfare. Appointed from civil life and possessing generally but little knowledge of the duties of an officer and rarely even the vocabulary of their profession they have heretofore been sent to vessels or batteries where it is impossible for them to obtain a knowledge of its most important branches, which can be best, if not only, acquired by methodical study." Mallory noted that there were 693 officers and 2,250 enlisted men in the Confederate Navy. He reported that while Union victories at Little Rock and on the Yazoo River had terminated the Department's attempts to construct ships in that area, construction was "making good progress at Richmond, Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, on the Roanoke, Peedee, Chattahoochee, and Alabama Rivers. . . ." Two major problems Mallory enumerated troubled the Confederacy throughout the conflict: the lack of skilled labor to build ships and the inability to obtain adequate iron to protect them. In the industrial North, neither was a difficulty--a factor which helped decide the course of the war.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2013 6:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 1, 1863 Tuesday
In Virginia Meade gave up trying to penetrate Lee’s Confederate line along Mine Run and the Army of the Potomac began retiring across the Rapidan River before going into winter quarters at Culpepper, Virginia.

A major command change was evolving in the Confederate army at Dalton, Georgia south of Chattanooga. After President Davis accepted Gen Braxton Bragg’s resignation, Bragg told Richmond he would relinquish his command on the second. He then wrote President Davis of the criticism against him by his generals and said, “The disaster admits of no palliation, and is justly disparaging to me as a commander…. I fear we both erred in the conclusion for me to retain command here after the clamor raised against me.” Bragg had at times proved himself an able soldier, but unable to work with his subordinates. For years to come the quarrels, charges, and countercharges would echo.

December opened with considerable, if not major, fighting. Fort Sumter was surviving another bombardment which began Nov 28. At Maynardville, Tennessee another fight marked the Knoxville Campaign; Longstreet still besieged Burnside’s Federals, but knew Federal reinforcements were on the way. In Arkansas skirmishing took place near Benton and Devall’s Bluff; in North Carolina at Cedar Point; in Virginia near Jonesville and at Jenning’s Farm near Ely’s Ford; in Kentucky at Salyersville, Mount Sterling, and Jackson; and in Mississippi at Ripley. Federals scouted around Pulaski, Tennessee and operated about Natchez, Mississippi for ten days.

Suffering from typhoid, Belle Boyd, Confederate spy, was released from prison in Washington, sent to Richmond, and told to stay out of Union lines.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 2, 1863 Wednesday
The Army of the Potomac was completing its withdrawal to north of the Rapidan River in Virginia, abandoning the abortive Mine Run Campaign. Longstreet was now being threatened from the rear by fast-approaching Federal troops intent on breaking the siege of Knoxville. Still the guns bellowed in Charleston Harbor against Fort Sumter. Elsewhere, fighting broke out at Walker’s Ford on the Clinch River, and there was a Confederate descent on Saulsbury and a skirmish at Philadelphia, Tennessee. In Arkansas Federals scouted through the seventh from Waldron to Mount Ida, Caddo Gap, and Dallas.

Gen Braxton Bragg turned over the command of the Army of Tennessee to Lieutenant General William Hardee ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_J._Hardee ) at Dalton, Georgia. Hardee, however, would be only temporarily in charge of the army that had been beaten back from Chattanooga. Bragg reminded the army of his two-year association with it and called for support of the new commander. He advised President Davis that the army should assume the offensive. Many of Bragg’s chief officers were glad to see him go. Although the Confederates were losing a fine disciplinarian and a dedicated soldier, he was also a man under whom few could operate successfully.

Commodore H. H. Bell, pro tem commander of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, reported to Secretary Welles the estimated Confederate naval strength at Mobile Bay. C.S.S. Gaines and Morgan mounted ten guns; C.S.S. Selma mounted four, as did the nearly completed ironclad C.S.S. Nashville. All were sidewheelers. Ironclad rams C.S.S. Baltic, Huntsville, and Tennessee all mounted four guns each. The latter, Admiral Buchanan's flag ship, was said to be "strong and fast." C.S.S. Gunnison was fitted as a torpedo boat carrying 150 pounds of powder and another screw steamer was reported being fitted out, though a fire had destroyed her upper works. In addition to two floating batteries mounting 3 guns each and 10 transport steamers at Mobile Bay, the report noted: "At Selma there is a large vessel building, to be launched in January. There are three large rams building on the Tombigbee River, to be launched during the winter." Rear Admiral Farragut would face four of these ships in Mobile Bay the following year. Lack of machinery, iron, and skilled mechanics prevented the rest from being little more than the phantoms which rumor frequently includes in estimates of enemy strength.

Boat expedition from U.S.S. Restless, commanded by Acting Master William R. Browne, reconnoitered Lake Ocala, Florida. Finding salt works in the area, the Union forces destroyed them. "They were in the practice of turning out 130 bushels of salt daily." Rear Admiral Bailey reported. "Besides destroying these boilers, a large quantity of salt was thrown into the lake, 2 large flatboats, and 6 ox carts were demolished, and 17 prisoners were taken. . . ." These destructive raids, destroying machinery, supplies, armament, and equipment, had a telling and lasting effect on the South, already short of all.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 3, 1863 Thursday
From Knoxville, Tennessee Longstreet began moving his army east and north toward Greeneville, where he later took up winter quarters at a position enabling him to move either to Virginia and Lee’s army, or to take offensive action in the West. The withdrawal marked the end of the fall campaign in Tennessee, a full-scale Federal victory. In east Tennessee a skirmish occurred at Log Mountain; and elsewhere fighting broke out at Saint Martinsville, Louisiana; Ellis’ Ford, Virginia; Greenville, Kentucky; and Wolf River Bridge near Moscow, Tennessee. Robert Vinkler Richardson, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General. U.S.S. New London, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Weld N. Allen, captured blockade running schooner del Nile near Padre Pass Island, Texas, with cargo including coffee, sugar, and percussion caps.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 9:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 4, 1863 Friday
As Longstreet pulled out of Knoxville, under pressure from Federal reinforcements, and retreated eastward in Tennessee, skirmishing flared near Kingston and Loudon. Skirmishing also occurred at Niobrara, Nebraska Territory; Meadow Bluff, West Virginia; La Fayette, Tennessee; and Ripley, Mississippi. At Charleston seven days of bombardment ended after 1307 rounds fired by the Union. Nathan Bedford Forrest, CSA, was appointed to Major General.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 5, 1863 Saturday
Fighting took place at Walker’s Ford on Clinch River, Tennessee as Longstreet continued toward Greeneville. Other action occurred at Murrell’s Inlet, South Carolina; Raccoon Ford, Virginia; and Crab Gap, Tennessee. A Union scout operated from New Berne toward Kinston, North Carolina and a reconnaissance by Federals from Rossville to Ringgold, Georgia. In other operations there was Federal reconnaissance Dec 5-13 from Little Rock to Princeton, Arkansas; Dec 5-25 from Norfolk, Virginia to South Mills and Camden Court House, North Carolina; and scouts Dec 5-10 from Columbia, Kentucky. Only sixty-one shells were fired in Charleston Harbor after the second great bombardment ended the day before. Boat crew under Acting Ensign William B. Arrants from U.S.S. Perry was captured while reconnoitering Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina, to determine if a ship being outfitted there as a blockade runner could be destroyed. Major General Robert C. Schenck, USA, is relieved of command of the Federal Middle Department, and the Federal 8th Army Corps and Brigadier General Henry H. Lockwood ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Hayes_Lockwood ), USA, assumes command.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 6, 1863 Sunday
Gen William T. Sherman and his staff entered Knoxville, Tennessee formally ending the siege of Burnside’s Federal troops. His troops were not far behind. Meanwhile, Longstreet’s Confederates were moving toward Greeneville, Tennessee. Fighting broke out near Fayetteville and Clinch Mountain, Tennessee. Elsewhere a skirmish took place on the Cheat River, West Virginia. In Charleston Harbor the monitor Weehawken sand at her anchorage near Morris Island because of imperfect design.

President Davis considered sending Lee to Dalton, Georgia to help reorganize the Army of Tennessee.

U.S.S. Weehawken, Commander Duncan, sank while tied up to a buoy inside the bar at Charleston harbor. Weehawken had recently taken on an extra load of heavy ammunition which reduced the freeboard forward considerably. In the strong ebb tide, water washed down an open hawse pipe and a hatch. The pumps were unable to handle the rush of water and Weehawken quickly foundered, drowning some two dozen officers and men.

U.S.S. Violet, commanded by Acting Ensign Thomas Stothard, and U.S.S. Aries, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Devens, sighted blockade running British steamer Ceres aground and burning at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, North Carolina. During the night, Ceres floated free and, the flames having been extinguished, was seized by Violet.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 7, 1863 Monday
In Washington the first session of the Thirty-eighth Congress convened, and in Richmond the fourth session of the First Congress. President Davis in his message to Congress wrote of the “grave reverses” of the past summer, but stated the progress of the enemy “has been checked.” There had been no improvement in foreign relations; finances demanded attention; no effort must be spared to augment the Army; it was regrettable that the enemy had refused to exchange prisoners of war; the Trans-Mississippi, virtually cut off from the rest of the Confederacy, had special problems. President Davis concluded by condemning the “savage ferocity” of the Federals, and added, “Nor has less relenting warfare been waged by these pretended friends of human rights and liberties against the unfortunate negroes…. The hope last year entertained of an early termination of the war has not been realized,… [but] The patriotism of the people has proved equal to every sacrifice demanded by their country’s need.”

Fighting was confined to Rutledge and Eagleville, Tennessee and Independence, Mississippi. A four-day Federal scout operated in Hampshire, Hardy, Frederick, and Shenandoah counties of West Virginia.

In his third annual report to the President, Secretary Welles wrote: "A blockade commencing at Alexandria, in Virginia, and terminating at the Rio Grande, has been effectively maintained. The extent of this blockade . . . covers a distance of three thousand five hundred and forty-nine statute miles, with one hundred and eighty-nine harbor or pier openings or indentations, and much of the coast presents a double shore to be guarded . . . a naval force of more than one hundred vessels has been employed in patrolling the rivers, cutting off rebel supplies, and cooperating with the armies . . . The distance thus traversed and patrolled by the gunboats on the Mississippi and its tributaries is 3,615 miles, and the sounds, bayous, rivers and inlets of the States upon the Atlantic and the Gulf, covering an extent of about 2,000 miles, have also been . . . watched with unceasing vigilance." Welles reported a naval strength of 34,000 seamen and 588 ships displacing 467,967 tons, mounting 4,443 guns. More than 1,000 ships had been captured by alert blockaders, as the results of weakness at sea were driven home to the beleaguered South. The North's mighty force afloat had severed the Confederacy along the Mississippi and pierced ever deeper into her interior; amphibious assaults from the sea had driven her still further from her coasts; and the vise of the blockade clamped down more tightly on an already withering economy and military capability.

Steamer Chesapeake of the New York and Portland Line, en route to Portland, Maine, was seized off Cape Cod by a group of 17 Confederate sympathizers led by John C. Braine. The bizarre undertaking had been planned at St. John, New Brunswick, by Captain John Parker (whose real name seems to have been Vernon G. Locke), former commander of the Confederate privateer Retribution. Parker ordered Braine and his men to New York where they purchased side arms and boarded Chesapeake as passengers. At the appropriate moment they threw aside their disguises, and, after a brief exchange of gunfire in which the second engineer was killed, took possession of the steamer. They intended to make for Wilmington after coaling in Nova Scotia. Captain Parker came on board in the Bay of Fundy and took charge ( http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundat ... teamer.htm ).

News of the capture elicited a quick response in the Navy Department. Ships from Philadelphia northward were ordered out in pursuit. On 17 December U.S.S. Ella and Annie, commanded by Acting Lieutenant J. Frederick Nickels, recaptured Chesapeake in Sambro Harbor, Nova Scotia. She was taken to Halifax where the Vice Admiralty Court ultimately restored the steamer to her original American owners. Most of the Confederates escaped and John Braine would again cause the Union much concern before the war ended.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 7:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 8, 1863 Tuesday
President Lincoln issued his Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction, pardoning those who “directly or by implication, participated in the existing rebellion” if they took an oath to the Union. Exceptions included high-ranking military officers, members of the Confederate government, all who resigned commissions in the U.S. Army and Navy to join the Confederacy, and those who treated Negroes or whites “otherwise than lawfully as prisoners of war.” If at least one tenth of the citizens who voted in the election of 1860 so wished, a state government would be recognized in any seceded state. Of course, said citizens must take an oath to support the United States, and slavery would be barred. Thus President Lincoln made a significant step toward reconstruction, and indicated his future course of moderation.

President Lincoln also issued his annual message to Congress, read to both Houses on Dec 9. He reported that for the most part foreign relations were peaceful and friendly; the territories were in satisfactory condition except for some Indian difficulties; the Treasury balance as of July 1 was over $5,329,000; the blockade had been increasingly efficient.

A year before, the President said, public opinion at home and abroad had not been satisfactory. “The crisis which threatened to divide the friends of the Union is past,” he declared optimistically. The enemy had been pushed back, the Mississippi opened, and emancipation was having a favorable effect. Praising those fighting for the Union, President Lincoln concluded that to them “the world must stand indebted for the home of freedom disenthralled, regenerated, enlarged, and perpetuated.” The President also wrote a note of gratitude to Maj Gen Grant for the victory at Chattanooga and Knoxville.

In Richmond President Davis, apprehensive over the military situation, asked Gen Lee to visit him. In the Confederate Congress Representative Henry S. Foote, of Mississippi, bitterly criticized the President’s military and civil policy.

Federal cavalry under Averell operated until the twenty-first from New Creek, West Virginia raiding railroads in southwestern Virginia. There were also demonstrations up the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and from the Kanawha Valley, West Virginia.

Acting Master W. T. Gillespie, U.S.S. Braziliera, reported that blockade running British schooner Antoinette ran aground on Cumberland Island, Georgia, and was a total wreck. "I have saved her anchors, chains, and sails, which will be of service to me," he wrote Rear Admiral Dahlgren "nothing else, either of cargo or outfit, of any value, remaining."

The disabled merchant steamer Henry Von Phul was shelled by a Confederate shore battery near Morganza, Louisiana. U.S.S. Neosho, commanded by Acting Ensign Edwin F. Brooks, and U.S.S. Signal, commanded by Acting Ensign William P. Lee, steamed up to defend the ship and silenced the battery. Union merchantmen were largely free from such attacks when convoyed by a warship.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 10:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 9, 1863 Wednesday
As the Federal Congress heard President Lincoln’s annual message read by the clerks, Maj Gen John G. Foster ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_G._Foster ) superseded Maj Gen A.E. Burnside ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambrose_Burnside ) in command of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside, criticized for his handling of the Copperhead movement and for not supporting Rosecrans at Chickamauga, had for some time wanted to leave his departmental command.

A mutiny of Negro troops at Fort Jackson, Louisiana below New Orleans was put down by Federal white officers. It arose over alleged mistreatment by one officer of his soldiers ( http://www.nytimes.com/1864/01/06/news/ ... ckson.html ). Skirmishes broke out at Okolona, Mississippi; near Lewinsville, Virginia; and there was an affair at Cumberland Mountain on the road to Crossville, Tennessee. Scouting and skirmishing also occurred for several days around Bean’s Station, Tennessee, part of the waning Knoxville Campaign. Federals scouted from Waldron down Dutch Creek, Arkansas and from Houston, Missouri.

U.S.S. Circassian, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Eaton, seized blockade running British steamer Minna at sea east of Cape Romain, South Carolina. The steamer was carrying cargo including iron, hardware, and powder. In addition, Eaton reported, "she has also as cargo a propellor and shaft and other parts of a marine engine, perhaps intended for some rebel ironclad."

U.S.S. Kennebec, commanded by Lieutenant Commander William P. J. McCann, captured schooner Marshall Smith off Mobile. She was attempting to run to Havana with cotton and turpentine.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 09, 2013 9:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 10, 1863 Thursday
Fighting flared in east Tennessee as Longstreet tried to gather his command in the Greeneville area. Skirmishing at Gatlinburg, Long Ford, Morristown, and Russellville marked the day. From Harper’s Ferry Federal cavalry operated on what was called the West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee Railroad raid. In North Carolina a skirmish occurred at Hertford. President Davis expressed concern over the disposition of troops for the Confederate armies. President Lincoln, increasingly active, appeared much improved in health.

U.S.S. Bloomer, commanded by Acting Ensign Edwin Crissey, and her tender, Caroline, reported to Acting Master W. R. Browne, U.S.S. Restless, to participate in an attack on the extensive salt works at St. Andrew's Bay, Florida. Next day, Restless bombarded the town of St. Andrew's, which had been used as a supply station for the salt works and as quarters for some 275 Confederate troops. "Selecting the largest group of houses," Browne reported, "we succeeded in firing it, our third shell bursting in one of the houses at the southeast end. The wind being E.S.E. communicated the flames quickly to the others, consisting of 32 houses and shanties, which were speedily reduced to ashes. . . ." Meanwhile Bloomer and Caroline destroyed the salt works lining the shores of the Bay. Remarking on the size of the main works, which produced some 400 bushels of salt daily, Browne wrote: "It was in fact a complete village, covering a space of three-fourths of a square mile, employing many bands and 16 ox and mule teams constantly to haul salt to Eufaula Sound, and from thence conveyed to Montgomery, at which place it is selling at fabulous prices--$40 and $45 per bushel. At this place, [St. Andrew's Bay] were 27 buildings, and 22 large steam boilers, and 300 kettles averaging 200 gallons each, which cost the Government $5 per gallon, all of which were totally destroyed, besides 2,000 bushels of salt, and storehouses filled with corn meal, bacon, sirup, and other provisions, enough to supply these employed for three months. . . ." The Union expedition also destroyed an unnamed schooner with cargo of 100 bales of cotton up Bear Creek.

Confederate troops burned schooner Josephine Truxillo and barge Stephany on Bayou Lacomb, Louisiana. Next day they burned schooner Sarah Bladen and barge Helana on Bayou Bonfouca.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2013 6:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2342
Location: USA
December 11, 1863 Friday
A relatively light bombardment of 220 rounds at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor exploded a magazine, killing 11 and wounding 41. The last bombardment of the year against Fort Sumter, it brought no sign of surrender.

The Federal West Virginia raid on railroads involved skirmishing at Big Sewell and Meadow Bluff. In Virginia skirmishing was at Marling’s Bottom Bridge. Federal scouts operated for three days from Waldron to Dallas, Arkansas and for a week from Pulaski, Tennessee to Florence, Alabama. Major General Frank P. Blair ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_P._Blair,_Jr. ), USA, is relieved of command of the 15th Army Corps, Federal Army of the Tennessee and Major General John A. Logan ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logan,_John_Alexander ), USA, assumes command.

Confederate Sec of War Seddon’s annual report admitted serious defeats, especially in Mississippi, and reduced military effectiveness because of desertion, straggling, and absenteeism. He recommended repeal of the substitute and exemption provisions of the draft law.

Confederate troops fired on U.S.S. Indianola in the Mississippi in an attempt to destroy her, but the effective counterfire of U.S.S. Carondelet, commanded by Acting Master James C. Gipson, drove them off. The Union Navy was exerting great effort to get Indianola off the bar on which she had sunk in February.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 366 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 31 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group