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PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2014 10:26 pm 
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November 26, 1864 Saturday
Major units of Hood’s Army of Tennessee arrived in front of Federal positions south of the Duck River at Columbia, Tennessee. Sherman’s troops continued skirmishing with Confederate cavalry at Sandersville, Georgia. In the West action included an affair near Plum Creek Station and a skirmish at Spring Creek, Nebraska Territory; a skirmish at Osage, Missouri; and a Union expedition until Dec 2 from Lewisburg to Strahan’s Landing, Arkansas. In northern Virginia troops skirmished at Fairfax Station. President Lincoln offered the post of Attorney General to Joseph Holt but he refused. Lucius Bellinger Northrop, CSA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2014 9:00 pm 
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November 27, 1864 Sunday
By evening the Army of Tennessee ranged in front of Columbia, Tennessee just south of the Duck River. The Federal commander, Schofield, expected Hood to attempt to turn his position, so he moved his entire command north of the river to prepared positions during the night of Nov 27-28, partly destroying the railroad and pontoon bridges. Schofield was getting erroneous reports from his cavalry commander, James H. Wilson, that Forrest had crossed the Duck River to the east above Columbia.

In the Georgia campaign, Wheeler’s Confederate cavalry halted Kilpatrick in two days of action at Waynesborough. Otherwise there was skirmishing at Moorefield, West Virginia; and the usual scouts, one by Federals from Little Rock to Benton, Arkansas; and another lasting until Dec 13, from Baton Rouge, Louisiana against the Mobile and Ohio Railroad.

An explosion and fire destroyed General Butler's headquarters steamer Greyhound, on the James River, Virginia, and narrowly missed killing Butler, Major General Schenck, and Rear Admiral Porter, on board for a conference on the forthcoming Fort Fisher expedition. Because of the nature of the explosion, it is likely that one of the deadly Confederate coal torpedoes had been planted in Greyhound's boiler. "The furnace door blew open," recalled Butler, "and scattered coals throughout the room." The so-called "coal torpedo" was a finely turned piece of cast iron containing ten pounds of powder and made to resemble closely a lump of coal, and was capable of being used with devastating effect. As Admiral Porter later described the incident: "We had left Bermuda Hundred five or six miles behind us when suddenly an explosion forward startled us, and in a moment large volumes of smoke poured out of the engine-room." The Admiral went on to marvel at the ingenuity which nearly cost him his life: "In devices for blowing up vessels the Confederates were far ahead of us, putting Yankee ingenuity to shame." This device was suspected of being the cause of several unexplained explosions during the war.

Blockade running British steamer Beatrice was captured by picket boats under Acting Master Gifford of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, off Charleston. The prize crew accidentally grounded Beatrice near Morris Island and she was soon a total wreck.

U.S.S. Princess Royal, under Commander Woolsey, seized blockade running British schooner Flash in the Gulf of Mexico off Brazos Santiago with cargo of cotton. Later in the day, Princess Royal also captured blockade running schooner Neptune. Woolsey reported: "The vessel was empty, having just lost a cargo of salt, said salt having, according to the master's statement, 'dissolved in her hold.' "

U.S.S. Metacomet, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Jouett, captured blockade running steamer Susanna in the Gulf of Mexico off Campeche Banks. Half her cargo of cotton was thrown overboard in the chase. Rear Admiral Farragut had regarded Susanna as "their fastest steamer."

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 10:11 pm 
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November 28, 1864 Monday
Cavalry of Gen Forrest crossed the Duck River above Columbia the evening of Nov 28 with most of the rest of Hood’s army ready to follow. Other troops of the Army of Tennessee occupied Columbia itself. Cavalry units of both armies skirmished at the crossings of the Duck River and at Shelbyville, Tennessee. Fighting increased in Georgia, with action at Buckhead Church and Buckhead Creek or Reynolds’ Plantation. Cavalry fought again near Davisborough and Waynesborough. Thomas L. Rosser ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_L._Rosser ) led his Confederate cavalry from the Shenandoah Valley to New Creek west of Cumberland, Maryland and the Baltimore and Ohio, capturing prisoners and extensive supplies. After knocking out the railroad bridge they pulled out, but they showed that Confederate raiders were not through in the East. Skirmishes occurred at Goresville, Virginia; Cow Creek, Kansas; and several lesser scouts and expeditions operated. Major General Napoleon J. T. Dana ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon_J.T._Dana ), USA, is assigned command of the newly created Federal Department of Mississippi.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 28, 2014 6:13 pm 
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November 29, 1864 Tuesday
Early in the morning two of the three corps of Hood’s Army of Tennessee, plus another division, crossed the Duck River above Columbia. They hoped to flank Schofield’s Federals north of the Duck and cut him off at Spring Hill from the route to Franklin and Nashville. Forrest’s cavalry skirmished at Spring Hill about midday, and in midafternoon Confederate infantry came in under Pat Cleburne. Meanwhile, there was firing along the Duck between the main body of Schofield and Confederates under S.D. Lee. Confederates at Spring Hill were thwarted by darkness and a few defenders. The Federals under David S. Stanley had worked nobly to keep the turnpike to Franklin open. Schofield finally pulled all his troops away from the Duck. Somehow or other he managed to pass his entire army northward up the pike under the nose of Hood’s army without suffering attack. Participants and historians were never able to determine what did or did not happen – charges and countercharges were many. At any rate, the entire Federal force, wagon train and all, got away clear to Franklin and took up a new position south of town. Hood had been told the Federals were passing and apparently did order some troops out, but nothing came of it except some ineffectual skirmishing. The “Spring Hill Affair” became one of the most controversial non-fighting events of the entire war (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Spring_Hill ).

Sand Creek, Colorado Territory will remain forever a blot on American history in the opinion of most historians. The citizens of the Denver area felt the need to put down the Indians who had been taking advantage of the lack of Federal troops and had committed numerous depredations. With some nine hundred volunteers, Col J.M. Chivington ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chivington ) moved out to the Indian camp on Sand Creek, some forty miles south of Fort Lyon, where there were over five hundred Arapahoes and Cheyennes. The Indians had insisted they were peaceable and contended they had not taken part in recent raids. Chivington’s force attacked the village without warning and massacred warriors, women, and children. Chivington reported, “It may perhaps be unnecessary for me to state that I captured no prisoners.” Chivington claimed between five hundred and six hundred killed, although that boast may be high. Among the dead was Black Kettle, a major chief. Some westerners approved, but easterners as a whole were aghast. Eventually the government condemned the massacre and paid indemnity to the survivors ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Creek_massacre ).

Sherman’s men continued what was becoming their destructive romp through Georgia with a skirmish near Louisville. There was also fighting near Boyd’s Landing, South Carolina; Charles Town, West Virginia; Doyal’s Plantation, Louisiana. Confederate guerrillas attacked the steamer Alamo on the Arkansas River, near Dardanelle, Arkansas. Robert Bullock, CSA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:32 pm 
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November 30, 1864 Wednesday
Leading units of the retreating Federals of Schofield’s force under Jacob Cox arrived at Franklin, Tennessee about dawn. They formed a defensive line south of the town and the Harpeth River. Schofield wished to hold Franklin until he could repair the bridges and get his trains across. Stung by the lost opportunity at Spring Hill, Hood moved rapidly toward Franklin on the main pike. A skirmish at Thompson’s Station south of the town and other Federal delaying moves slowed the Confederate advance. About 4PM Hood debouched from the Winstead Hills in a massive frontal attack against the well-posted Federals on the southern edge of Franklin. Gallantly the Confederates pressed ahead, carrying forward works of the enemy, though suffering heavily. After a near break, the Federals rallied on the interior lines. Some of the bloodiest and most tragic fighting of the war occurred in front of the Carter House and up and down the lines at Franklin, but to no avail for Hood. The battle lasted well into the night ( http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/franklin.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Franklin_(1864) ).

For the Confederates the toll included six generals: the famous and capable Pat Cleburne ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Cleburne ), S.R. Gist ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States_Rights_Gist ), H.B. Granbury ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiram_B._Granbury ), John Adams ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Adams ... my_officer) ), O.F. Strahl ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otho_F._Strahl ), all killed outright, and John C. Carter ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Carter ), mortally wounded. The Confederates had between 20,000 and 27,000 men in action, and lost 1750 killed, 3800 wounded, and 702 missing for 6252. Schofield’s Federals numbered between 22,000 and 27,000 engaged and they suffered many fewer casualties: 189 killed, 1033 wounded, and 1104 missing for 2326. For Schofield’s valiant defenders, Gen Jacob D. Cox, commanding the Twenty-third Corps and really in command of the field, deserves much credit.

During the night, Schofield pulled his battered units north across the Harpeth River and headed toward Nashville. The Confederates had failed to break the Union lines and suffered ghastly casualties they could not afford, but they did proceed on to Nashville.

Sherman marched on, with a skirmish at Louisville, Georgia. There was also action near Dalton, Georgia; Kabletown, West Virginia; and Snicker’s Gap, Virginia. At Honey Hill or Grahamville, near the South Carolina coast, Federal troops from Hilton Head moved out to attack. Their purpose was to enlarge Union holdings and outposts in the area and to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. But the Georgia militia threw back the Federals, who then withdrew ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Honey_Hill ). There was no real attempt to aid Sherman by marching in from the seacoast, though this had been discussed.

In a message to Beauregard, President Davis said he believed Sherman “may move directly for the Coast.” The Confederates must concentrate and his army must be reduced and rendered ineffective. Davis thought Hood would not have an effect on Federal strategy until the Confederates reached Union territory.

U.S.S. Itasca, commanded by Lieutenant Commander George Brown, seized blockade running British schooner Carrie Mair off Pass Cavallo, Texas.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 5:17 pm 
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December 1, 1864 Thursday
The Federal troops of John M. Schofield had successfully withdrawn from Franklin, Tennessee and were now taking their places in the Nashville defense lines of Gen George H. Thomas. The Federals formed a rough semicircle south of the Tennessee capital, with both flanks resting on the Cumberland River. John Bell Hood’s weary Army of Tennessee moved upon Nashville with little pause to take care of the casualties or to reorganize after woeful toll exacted at Franklin on Nov 30. Already he was too late, for the Union had stanchly entrenched on the hills of the city. Hood faced two alternatives: to lie in front of the city in partial siege and await attack, or to bypass Nashville, which would leave Thomas in his rear. Some minor scraps included one at Owen’s Cross Roads.

Sherman’s invaders, more than halfway from Atlanta to Savannah, proceeded with little difficulty as they approached Millen, Georgia, site of a prison camp for Northern soldiers ( http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/camplawton.html ). Federals were reported heading toward notorious Andersonville ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andersonvi ... toric_Site ), far to the south, to free the prisoners there. There was a skirmish at Shady Grove, of little consequence. Skirmishing also occurred at Stony Creek Station, Virginia. In the West several Federal expeditions operated against guerrillas. Other action included a fight near Cypress Creek in Perry County, Arkansas and operations near Waynesville, Missouri.

James Speed of Kentucky was told he was appointed Attorney General by the President, succeeding resigned Edward Bates.

U.S.S. Rhode Island, under Commander Stephen D. Trenchard, captured blockade running British steamer Vixen off Cape Fear, North Carolina, with cargo including arms.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 9:19 pm 
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December 2, 1864 Friday
Advance units of Hood’s Army of Tennessee approached the Federal lines at Nashville, establishing their own positions this day and on Dec 3. Cavalry carried out operations against blockhouses and outer positions of Thomas’ Federal defenders, with some skirmishing. Washington ordered Thomas to attack Hood soon. Maj Gen Grenville M. Dodge ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grenville_M._Dodge ) was named to replace Gen Rosecrans as commander of the Department of Missouri. Rosecrans long had experienced difficulty with the various divided political forces in Missouri and had proved inept in the administration of his difficult command, one which had defeated several generals. Brigadier General Thomas J. Wood ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_J._Wood ), USA, assumes command of the Federal 4th Army Corps, due to the wounding of Major General David S. Stanley ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_S._Stanley ), USA, during the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee. Brigadier General Archibald Gracie, Jr. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Gracie_III ), CSA, is killed instantly by a Federal artillery shell as he observed Union positions through his telescope during the siege of Petersburg, Virginia. Confederate Major General Sterling Price, CSA, and his Confederate troops reach Laynesport, Arkansas, effectively ending his latest and last Confederate expedition into Missouri.

U.S.S. Pequot, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Braine sighted blockade running steamer Ella off the coast of South Carolina and pursued her for nearly seven hours before darkness halted the chase. Early in the morning, 3 December, U.S.S. Emma, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Thomas Dunn, sighted Ella steering for the western bar of the Cape Fear River, and, attempting to intercept her, forced the runner aground near the light at Bald Head Point. Ships of the blockading squadron shelled the grounded Ella for two days before a boarding party commanded by Acting Ensign Isaac S. Sampson burned Ella on 5 December.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:44 pm 
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December 3, 1864 Saturday
With both sides dug in at Nashville, that front appeared to be at a standstill for a while, although Federal authorities in Washington and Gen Grant in Virginia were urging Thomas to attack. Sherman was at Millen, Georgia with the Seventeenth Corps. The other corps in Georgia were the Fifteenth, south of the Ogeechee River, the Twentieth, on the Augusta railroad about four miles north of Millen, and the Fourteenth, near Lumpkin’s Station on the Augusta railroad. All units began to march toward Savannah, and from now on the opposition was even lighter than it had been. As they neared the coast, the country grew more sandy and then tended to marshes and creeks. The soldiers lived off the country and their reckless destruction of property continued. There was a mild skirmish at Thomas’ Station. Elsewhere, skirmishes took place in Perry County, Arkansas; and near New Madrid, Missouri; and a Federal naval expedition operated against salt works at Rocky Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. President Lincoln worked on his annual message to Congress and conferred about the possibility of naming Salmon P. Chase Chief Justice. The Federal 10th Army Corps is discontinued. The Federal 18th Army Corps is discontinued. Major General Edward O. C. Ord ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Ord ), USA, assumes command of the newly organized Federal 24th Army Corps. Major General Godfrey Weitzel ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_Weitzel ), USA, assumes command of the newly organized Federal 25th Army Corps.

U.S.S. Mackinaw, under Commander Beaumont, captured schooner Mary at sea east off Charleston with cargo of cotton, tobacco, and turpentine.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:54 pm 
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December 4, 1864 Sunday
Late on Dec 3, Wheeler’s Confederate cavalry attacked troops guarding railroad wreckers at Waynesborough, Georgia. A heavy engagement, largely involving cavalry, continued throughout the day. Kilpatrick advanced his Federals to charge Wheeler’s Confederates, who, in turn, countercharged. Eventually the dismounted Federal troops drove the Confederates from several positions. There also was skirmishing in Georgia near Statesborough, Station No 5 on the Georgia Central, at the Little Ogeechee River, and near Lumpkin’s Station. In Tennessee Thomas realized he must attack Hood’s Confederates. Thomas prepared energetically and awaited further reinforcements. Skirmishing developed at White’s Station and Bell’s Mills, Tennessee. Otherwise, action occurred on the New Texas Road near Morganza, Louisiana; with Indians on Cow Creek near Fort Zarah, Kansas; and near Davenport Church, Virginia. James Monroe Goggin, CSA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, captured and burned whaling bark Edward off Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic.

U.S.S. Chocura, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Meade, captured schooner Lowood south of Velasco, Texas, with cargo of cotton. Calling Lowood "a notorious blockade runner", Meade said: "We had been watching this schooner for some time and finally laid a trap for her, which has proved successful."

U.S.S. Pembina, commanded by Lieutenant Commander James G. Maxwell, seized blockade running Dutch brig Geziena Hilligonda near Brazos Santiago, Texas, with cargo including medicines, iron, and cloth.

Boats from U.S.S. Pursuit, commanded by Acting Lieutenant George Taylor, captured Peep O'Day near Indian River, Florida, with cargo of cotton.

U.S.S. R. R. Cuyler, under Commander Caldwell, U.S.S. Mackinaw, under Commander Beaumont, and U.S.S. Gettysburg, commanded by Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, captured blockade running steamer Armstrong at sea (33º N., 78º W.). R. R. Cuyler and Gettysburg, joined by U.S.S. Montgomery, picked up a number of bales of cotton thrown over by Armstrong during the chase. Mackinaw had earlier in the day captured brig Hattie E. Wheeler with cargo of sugar.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 7:54 pm 
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December 5, 1864 Monday
The Congress of the United States gathered for the second session of the Thirty-eighth Congress.

At Nashville Hood sent Forrest’s cavalry and a division of infantry toward Murfreesboro. They carried out three days of demonstrations during which there was some fighting, but the Confederates were unable to take the town and the infantry withdrew. Sherman’s men fought a brief skirmish at the Little Ogeechee River in Georgia. There was also a minor skirmish to the north, at Dalton, Georgia.

In his fourth annual report to the President, Secretary Welles noted the great impact on the Confederacy made by Union seapower. Of the tireless blockaders he wrote: "The blockade of a coast line . . . greater in extent than the whole coast of Europe from Cape Trafalger to Cape North, is an undertaking without precedent in history." Welles observed that while successful runs through the blockade brought huge profits, "the blockade has not been violated with impunity. Heavy losses have befallen most of those who have been engaged in the illicit trade. Sixty-five steamers, the aggregate value of which, with their cargoes, will scarcely fall short of thirteen millions of dollars, have been captured or destroyed in endeavoring to enter or escape from Wilmington. Over fifty such results have occurred since Rear-Admiral Dahlgren anchored his monitor inside of Charleston bar and closed that port to commerce." By this date the United States Navy, consisting of only 42 ships on active duty in March 1861, had grown to 671 ships mounting more than 4,600 guns. A total of 203 ships had been built for the naval service since March 1861, including 62 ironclads. This growing force had ringed the South with an increasingly close blockade which by December 1864 had taken nearly 1,400 prizes. In addition, the Secretary noted four ships had been lost to the Southern naval cause in the course of the year: the commerce raiders Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, and the fearsome ram Albemarle. Moreover, the last major Gulf port had been closed with the Union victory at Mobile Bay. The fierce engagement, Welles wrote, was one which "in many respects [is] one of the most remarkable on record, and which added new lustre even to the renown of Rear-Admiral Farragut. . . ."

U.S.S. Chocura, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Meade, seized blockade running British schooner Julia south of Velasco, Texas, with cargo including bar iron, medicines, cotton bagging, and rope.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 6:53 pm 
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December 6, 1864 Tuesday
Former Sec of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase was named Chief Justice, succeeding the deceased Roger B. Taney. Although President Lincoln had had difficulties with him during his Cabinet years, the President had considered Chase at the head of the list for the Supreme Court since Taney’s death. Perhaps Lincoln thought of eliminating Chase as a perennial presidential candidate, perhaps he recognized that Chase’s abilities were well suited to the post.

Following the custom of the day, President Lincoln sent his annual message to Congress, where it was read to the highly interested members, for all were aware of the momentous questions of war and reconstruction facing the Union. Opening the message without emphasis on the war, Mr Lincoln noted that the state of foreign affairs was reasonably satisfactory. He mentioned some previously closed ports now open and hoped foreign merchants would trade there rather than resort to blockade-running. “I regard our emigrants as one of the principal replenishing streams which are appointed by Providence to repair the ravages of internal war, and its wastes of national strength and health,” he wrote. Financial conditions were satisfactory and, despite the war, the Treasury showed a balance for the year ending July 1, 1863. The War and Navy departments had spent $776,525,135.74 out of expenditures of $865,234,087.86. He did call for increased taxation. The public debt was $1,740,690,489.49. Westward expansion was continuing, the new Agricultural Department was developing. Still, “The war continues.” However, the armies had steadily advanced. He reported favorably on the reconstruction efforts in Louisiana, Maryland, and elsewhere. The President asked for reconsideration of the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, which he said the people approved in their election decision. The people are united on “the distinct issue of Union or no Union,” for “The public purpose to re-establish and maintain the nation authority is unchanged, and, as we believe, unchangeable.” As to peace, the insurgents “cannot voluntarily reaccept the Union; we cannot voluntarily yield it.” The issue can only be decided by war. But if the insurgent government cannot accept peace and reunion, the people can, and some desire it. The President admitted readmission of members of Congress was not in presidential hands. “I mean simply to say that the war will cease on the part of the government, whenever it shall have ceased on the part of those who began it.”

Gen Grant issued new orders to Gen Thomas at Nashville: “Attack Hood at once and wait no longer for remount of your cavalry. There is great danger of delay resulting in a campaign back to the Ohio River.” Thomas obediently said he would attack at once, although it would be hazardous without cavalry. A Union naval flotilla on the Cumberland River engaged Southern batteries near Bell’s Mills, Tennessee. Federal troops on the south Atlantic coast demonstrated against the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, but did not break it. Other action included a skirmish at Lewisburg, Arkansas; Federal expeditions in Arkansas and Virginia; and a Confederate raid from Paris, Tennessee to Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Patrick Henry Jones, USA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

U.S.S. Chocura, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Meade, seized blockade running British schooner Lady Hurley off Velasco, Texas, with cargo including bar iron, steel, salt, and medicines.

U.S.S. Princess Royal, under Commander Woolsey, captured blockade running schooner Alabama after forcing her aground near San Luis Pass, Texas. Her crew abandoned ship, Woolsey's boarding party worked her free and took the prize to Galveston. Her cargo included iron bars, rope, flour, and soda.

U.S.S. Sunflower, commanded by Acting Master Charles Loring, III, seized blockade running sloop Pickwick off St. George's Sound, Florida.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2014 10:02 pm 
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December 7, 1864 Wednesday
Federal military authorities were in ferment over Thomas’ failure to attack Hood at Nashville. Grant told Stanton if Thomas did not attack promptly he should be removed. Fighting was fairly severe at Murfreesboro, where Confederates under Forrest demonstrated against the Union outpost. Sherman’s marauding army, getting closer to Savannah daily, skirmished at Jenks’ Bridge on the Ogeechee River, at Buck Creek and Cypress Swamp near Sister’s Ferry, Georgia. At Fort Monroe, Virginia, ships, men, and supplies were being gathered for the forthcoming expedition to Fort Fisher, North Carolina aimed at cutting off the last major Confederate port open to blockade-runners. Fighting broke out at Moselle Bridge near Franklin, Missouri and near Paint Rock Bridge, Alabama. Federal expeditions continued around Devall’s Bluff and elsewhere in Arkansas and in Virginia.

U.S.S. Narcissus, commanded by Acting Ensign William G. Jones, struck a Confederate torpedo in a heavy storm while lying off the city of Mobile. Jones reported: ". . . the vessel struck a torpedo, which exploded, lifting her nearly out of water and breaking out a large hole in the starboard side, amidships . . . causing the vessel to sink in about fifteen minutes." The tug went down without loss of life and was raised later in the month. Mobile Bay was in Union hands, but Southern torpedoes took a heavy toll of Northern ships.

Blockade running steamer Stormy Petrel was run ashore and fired upon by gunboats of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron while attempting to enter Wilmington. Stormy Petrel was totally destroyed a few days later by a gale.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:51 pm 
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December 8, 1864 Thursday
Sherman’s marching army could almost smell the sea; the changing terrain and vegetation indicated that they were fast approaching their goal. Skirmishing flared at Ebenezer Creek and near Bryan Court House, Georgia.

Gen Grant told Halleck in Washington, “If Thomas has not struck yet, he ought to be ordered to hand over his command to Schofield.” Grant admitted he feared Hood would get to the Ohio River. Halleck demurred, saying the decision to remove Thomas was up to Grant. Grant again urged Thomas directly to attack, but Thomas wired that his cavalry would not be ready before Dec 11. There was skirmishing on the Petersburg front at Hatcher’s Run, Virginia. Out in Missouri an affair took place at Tuscumbia. Major General Napoleon J. T. Dana ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon_J.T._Dana ), USA, assumes commands of the Federal Department of Mississippi.

U.S.S. J. P. Jackson, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Pennington, with U.S.S. Stockdale, commanded by Acting Master Thomas Edwards, in company, captured blockade running schooner Medora in Mississippi Sound with cargo of cotton. U.S.S. Cherokee, commanded by Lieutenant William E. Dennison, captured blockade running British steamer Emma Henry at sea east of North Carolina with cargo of cotton. U.S.S. Itasca, commanded by Lieutenant Commander George Brown, chased blockade running sloop Mary Ann ashore at Pass Cavallo, Texas. Brown removed her cargo of cotton and destroyed her.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:24 pm 
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Location: USA
December 9, 1864 Friday
Activity increased at Petersburg; a two-day Federal reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run involved several skirmishes. Down in Georgia Sherman’s men moved close to Savannah, particularly to the immediate south of the city. Skirmishing broke out at the Ogeechee Canal between Eden and Pooler stations, at Cuyler’s Plantation and Monteith Swamp. Gen Grant issued an order replacing Thomas at Nashville with Gen Schofield. He suspended the order when Thomas told him he had planned to attack on the tenth, but a heavy storm of freezing rain had set in, making advance impossible. Thomas blamed his delay on necessary concentration of men, horses, and supplies. U.S.S. Otsego and a tug were sunk by torpedoes in the Roanoke River near Jamesville, North Carolina.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:39 pm 
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December 10, 1864 Saturday
The marching part of Sherman’s Georgia Campaign was over. He had arrived in front of Savannah! The Federal army was almost in sight of the ocean, but Hardee’s defenders were strongly entrenched and had flooded the rice fields, leaving only five narrow causeways as approaches to the city. Sherman determined not to assault but to invest the city. The Federal army had not made contact with the supply vessels and the Federal navy offshore, although stores were not too short, at least for men. Horses, however, soon began to suffer. Immense amounts of forage were needed daily, and with the army stationary, all nearby feed was soon used up. Cavalry was ordered to investigate Fort McAllister guarding the Ogeechee River, obvious path of contact between Sherman and the fleet. In the defense Hardee had something under 18,000 men. Richmond had been suggesting withdrawal and concentration of all available Confederate forces in South Carolina, assuming Sherman would turn northward. There was a skirmish at Springfield, Georgia; and a Confederate steamer, Ida, was captured and burned on the Savannah River.

Bad weather continued at Nashville, making any movements hazardous. On other fronts there was skirmishing at Petersburg in front of Fort Holly; Federal scouting from Core Creek to Southwest Creek, North Carolina; a Union expedition until Dec 21 against Indians in central Arizona Territory. Federal troops under George Stoneman moved from Knoxville toward east Tennessee and southwestern Virginia, aiming at the Confederate salt works and supply depots. President Lincoln named Maj Gen William F. Smith and Henry Stanbery as special commissioners to investigate civil and military affairs on and west of the Mississippi River. President Lincoln receives a letter of resignation from Marshal Lamon ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_Hill_Lamon ), because Lincoln does not take proper precautions to guard against assassination.

U.S.S. O. H. Lee, commanded by Acting Master Oliver Thacher, captured blockade running British schooner Sort off Anclote Keys, Florida, with cargo of cotton.

C.S.S. Macon, commanded by Lieutenant Kennard, C.S.S. Sampson, commanded by Lieutenant William W. Carnes, and C.S.S. Resolute, commanded by Acting Master's Mate William D. Oliveira, under Flag Officer Hunter, took Union shore batteries under fire at Tweedside on the Savannah River. Hunter attempted to run his gunboats downriver to join in the defense of Savannah, but was unable to pass the strong Federal batteries. Resolute was disabled in this exchange of fire, 12 December, and was abandoned and captured. Recognizing that he could not get his remaining two vessels to Savannah, and having destroyed the railroad bridge over the Savannah River which he had been defending, Hunter took advantage of unusually high water to move upstream to Augusta.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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