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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:32 pm 
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February 15, 1864 Monday
President Davis now wondered if Sherman’s column, which he thought was headed for Mobile, was instead marching toward Montgomery, Alabama. In fact, Sherman had not gone beyond Meridian, Mississippi. Some of his troops skirmished at Marion Station. From Vicksburg a small expedition to Grand Gulf ranged until March 6. Skirmishes broke out in West Virginia at Laurel Creek in Wayne County and in Arkansas at Saline River. In Missouri an affair took place near Charleston. Until Feb 23 another Federal expedition in Florida made its way from Fernandina to Woodstock and King’s Ferry Mills. U.S.S. Virginia, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Charles H. Brown, seized blockade running British schooner Mary Douglas off San Luis Pass, Texas, with cargo of bananas, coffee, and linen.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 9:07 pm 
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February 16, 1864 Tuesday
President Davis, still concerned over supplies of food and other materiel to the armies solicited suggestions to remedy defects in the logistical arrangements.

In the Meridian Campaign there was fighting at Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi; and elsewhere there was an affair at Fairfield, North Carolina; a skirmish at Indian Bay and Caddo Gap, Arkansas. Some minor Federal probings and ship and shore operations, including bombardment of Fort Powell, took place until late March around Mobile, Alabama, aggravating the Confederate fear of an attack. In Washington Territory Federal troops campaigned against Indians from Fort Walla Walla to the Snake River, Feb 16-23. Two blockade-runners were halted near Wilmington, North Carolina. Pet was captured by the blockaders and Spunky chased ashore and destroyed.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 3:29 pm 
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February 17, 1864 Wednesday
Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._L._Hunley_(submarine) ), commanded by Lieutenant George E. Dixon, CSA, destroyed U.S.S. Housatonic ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Housatonic_(1861) ), commanded by Captain Charles W. Pickering, off Charleston, and became the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in combat. After Hunley sank the preceding fall for the second time, she was raised, a new volunteer crew trained, and for months under the cover of darkness moved out into the harbor where she awaited favorable conditions and a target. This night, the small cylindrical-shaped craft with a spar torpedo mounted on the bow found the heavy steam sloop of war Housatonic anchored outside the bar. just before 9 o'clock in the evening, Acting Master John K. Crosby, Housatonic's officer of the deck, sighted an object in the water about 100 yards off but making directly for the ship. "It had the appearance of a plank moving in the water." Nevertheless Housatonic slipped her cable and began backing full; all hands were called to quarters. It was too late. Within two minutes of her first sighting, H. L. Hunley rammed her torpedo into Housatonic's starboard side, forward of the mizzenmast. The big warship was shattered by the ensuing explosion and "sank immediately."

The Charleston Daily Courier reported on 29 February: "The explosion made no noise, and the affair was not known among the fleet until daybreak, when the crew were discovered and released from their uneasy positions in the rigging. They had remained there all night. Two officers and three men were reported missing and were supposed to be drowned. The loss of the Housatonic caused great consternation in the fleet. All the wooden vessels are ordered to keep up steam and to go out to sea every night, not being allowed to anchor inside. The picket boats have been doubled and the force in each boat increased."

Dixon and his daring associates perished with H. L. Hunley in the attack. The exact cause of her loss was never determined, but as Confederate Engineer James H Tomb later observed: "She was very slow in turning, but would sink at a moment's notice and at times without it." The submarine, Tomb added, "was a veritable coffin to this brave officer and his men." But in giving their lives the gallant crew of H. L. Hunley wrote a fateful page in history--for their deed foretold the huge contributions submarines would make in later years in other wars.

Boat expedition under the command of Acting Ensign J. G. Koehler, U.S.S. Tahoma, destroyed a large Confederate salt works and a supply of salt near St. Marks, Florida.

In the Meridian, Mississippi Campaign skirmishing erupted near Pontotoc, and in the Houlka Swamp near Houston. In Arkansas there were skirmishes at Black’s Mill and Horse Head Creek. A two-day Federal scout from Warrenton, Virginia involved skirmishing near Piedmont. A Union expedition moved from Motley’s Ford, Tennessee to Murphy, North Carolina. James Patton Anderson, CSA, was appointed to Major General.

An act of the Confederate Congress suspended the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus until Aug 2 to meet resistance to the conscription law and other disloyal activities. Suspension was restricted to arrests made under authority of the President and the Secretary of War. President Davis arranged to send reinforcements from J.E. Johnston’s army in north Georgia to Polk, believed to be threatened in Mississippi by a Federal move to the Gulf.

The First Confederate Congress adjourned its fourth session amid overt discontent with the Davis administration and the progress of the war.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:24 pm 
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February 18, 1864 Thursday
Sherman’s force at Meridian, Mississippi still disrupted Confederate railroads and supply depots. Fighting broke out, with a skirmish at Aberdeen, near Okolona, in the northern part of Mississippi, in conjunction with the Federal column cooperating with Sherman from Memphis. Other action was recorded at Mifflin, Maryville, and Sevierville, Tennessee; Ringgold, Georgia; and near the headwaters of the Piney in Missouri. A two-day Federal scout operated from Ooltewah, Tennessee to Burke’s and Ellidge’s mills, Georgia. Alexander Travis Hawthorn, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

President Lincoln wrote Gov John A. Andrew of Massachusetts that if “it be really true that Massachusetts wishes to afford a permanent home within her borders, for all, or even a large number of colored persons who will come to her, I shall be only too glad to know it…. ( http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/te ... oln7%3A410 )” The President also issued a proclamation lifting the blockade of Brownsville, Texas thereby allowing normal trade, but of course no commerce in military articles ( http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/te ... oln7%3A412 ).

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 6:06 pm 
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February 19, 1864 Friday
Fighting occurred about Brown’s Ferry, Alabama; near Houston, at Egypt Station, and near Meridian, Mississippi; Grossetete, Louisiana; near Independence, Missouri; and at Waugh’s Farm near Batesville, Arkansas. President Davis asked Admiral Franklin Buchanan what plans he had for defeating a reported naval demonstration on Mobile. "A fair, plump lady" from Dubuque, Iowa, who merely wants to see President Lincoln and interrupts his cabinet meeting. Brigadier General William Edwin Baldwin ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Edwin_Baldwin ), CSA, dies near Dog River Factory, Alabama, after falling from his horse, when his saddle straps broke.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:16 pm 
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February 20, 1864 Saturday
Brig Gen Truman Seymour ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truman_Seymour ) and some 5500 Federal troops were near Olustee or Ocean Pond, Florida on a march from Barber’s Plantation toward Lake City, Florida. Seymour’s force advanced against Confederates under Brig Gen Joseph Finegan ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Finegan ). Two Union regiments, the Seventh New Hampshire and the Eighth U.S. Colored Troops, gave way in confusion at the opening of the battle. The approximately 5000 Confederates renewed the attack from strong fieldworks and fought vigorously until dark, when Seymour withdrew. The cavalry ineffectively pursued the retreating Federals. While the Northerners fell back to Jacksonville, Confederates rapidly repaired the damaged railroads. Casualties for the Federals were heavy, with 203 killed, 1152 wounded, and 506 missing for a total of 1861. The Confederates suffered 93 killed and 841 wounded for 934 casualties, in what was the major battle of the war in Florida ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Olustee ).

Sherman, at Meridian, Mississippi while anxious about W. Sooy Smith’s operations to the north, withdrew in leisurely fashion toward Vicksburg with no fighting. The march had totaled between 360 and 450 miles, with 21 killed, 68 wounded, 81 missing for a total of 170. Confederates immediately went to work repairing the railroads and other damage.

Elsewhere, fighting broke out on the Sevierville Road near Knoxville, at Flat Creek, and Strawberry Plains, Tennessee; West Point, Mississippi; Upperville and Front Royal, Virginia; near Hurricane Bridge, West Virginia; and Pease Creek, Florida. For a week a Union expedition operated from Helena up the White River of Arkansas.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 7:57 pm 
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February 21, 1864 Sunday
The northern part of the Meridian Campaign was not as successful for the Federals as Sherman’s in Mississippi. After fighting at Union, Ellis’ Bridge, West Point, Prairie Station, and near Okolona, William Sooy Smith retreated toward Memphis, bested by Forrest’s Confederate cavalry. Casualties were light on both sides. Smith had destroyed considerable railroad facilities, cotton, and corn. Hundreds of Negroes flocked to the Northern column. Smith did not feel that he could get through to join Sherman.

Elsewhere, fighting was light, with skirmishes near Circleville and Dranesville, Virginia and a Union scout from New Creek to Moorefield, West Virginia.

President Davis was worried about the pressure on the inner bastion of the Confederacy; in Mississippi; against Johnston in north Georgia; at Charleston, South Carolina; and against Longstreet in east Tennessee; and, of course, the front in Virginia.

U.S.S. Para, commanded by Acting Master Edward G. Furber, escorted troops up the St. Mary's River to Woodstock Mills, Florida, to obtain lumber. The 200-ton schooner engaged Confederates along the river banks and covered the transports while a large quantity of lumber was taken on board. On 21 February, Para captured small steamer Hard Times.

Lieutenant Commander Francis M. Ramsay off the mouth of the Red River reported that the water in the river was too low for three Confederate gunboats at Shreveport to get over the falls. This boded ill for the success of the Federals' Red River expedition soon to be undertaken.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:30 pm 
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February 22, 1864 Monday
Sec of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, again enmeshed in political intrigue, once more offered to resign. (Eventually President Lincoln refused this resignation.) The crisis arose from the so-called “Pomeroy Circular,” a document indicative of the machinations of a few Radical Republicans and violent abolitionists opposed to Lincoln’s reelection. Signed by Sen Samuel C. Pomeroy of Kansas, the paper advocated Chase for President. Chase, in a letter to the President, denied knowledge of the circular, but admitted consultation with those urging him to run. Other evidence suggests that Chase was cognizant of and approved the publication.

Meanwhile, qualified voters in the restored Union government of Louisiana elected Michael Hahn governor of the army-occupied state.

Early in the morning, Forrest’s Southern cavalry mounted a furious charge against Federal positions near Okolona, Mississippi. W. Sooy Smith’s force was retiring toward Memphis after its frustrated attempt to join with Sherman’s Meridian Campaign. Under the attack, a Tennessee Union regiment gave way and a five-mile running fight developed. Smith’s men took a stand as Forrest charged again. Federals counterattacked to cover the retreat to Memphis. During the often hand-to-hand combat, Jeffrey Forrest, brother of the general, was killed. The engagement of Okolona, also known as Ivey’s Farm or Ivey Hills, was one of Forrest’s greatest victories and an ignominious loss for Smith. During the whole campaign Smith lost 54 killed, 179 wounded, and 155 missing for 388 out of over 6000. Forrest claimed he had 2500 men at Okolona, losing 25 killed, 75 wounded, and 8 or 10 captured. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Okolona and http://www.okolona.org/aboutbattle.html )

Union troops of Thomas’ Army of the Cumberland moved out to investigate J. E. Johnston’s Confederate positions around Dalton, Georgia. Confederate cavalry was pushed in and Federals moved toward Dalton and Tunnel Hill and along Rocky Face Ridge in demonstrations lasting until Feb 25.

Skirmishes erupted at Luna Landing, Arkansas; Lexington and Warrensburg, Missouri; Indianola, Texas; Whitemarsh Island, Georgia; Gibson’s and Wyerman’s mills on Indian Creek, Virginia; and Powell’s Bridge and Calfkiller Creek, Tennessee. Confederates raided Mayfield, Kentucky. President Lincoln approves an act of Congress creating the office of lieutenant general and nominates Gen Grant for the honor.

U.S.S. Virginia, commanded by Acting Lieutenant C. H. Brown, captured blockade running British schooner Henry Colthirst, off San Luis Pass, Texas, with cargo of gunpowder, hardware, and provisions.

U.S.S. Linden, commanded by Acting Master Thomas M. Farrell, attempting to aid transport Ad. Hines, hit a snag in the Arkansas River and sank.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 5:07 pm 
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February 23, 1864 Tuesday
Federal troops of Thomas’ Army of the Cumberland under Maj Gen J. M. Palmer ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Palmer_(politician) ) drove toward Johnston’s Confederate position near Dalton, with fighting at Catoosa Station and Tunnel Hill in what is often called the Demonstration on Dalton, Georgia ( http://civilwarguide.info/battle.php?id=272 ). President Davis, trying to reinforce Johnston in Georgia and Polk in Mississippi, queried Johnston as to whether “the demonstration in your front is probably a mask.”

A skirmish occurred near New Albany, Mississippi. Feb 23-Mar 9 Federals scouted from Springfield, Missouri into northern Arkansas, and fought several skirmishes. William Brimage Bate, CSA, was appointed to Major General. Robert Charles Tyler, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

President Lincoln wrote Sec Chase that he would comment more fully later about the Pomeroy Circular, in which Chase was advocated as a Republican presidential candidate to replace Lincoln. The Cabinet met without Chase (and two other members) in attendance.

Richmond saw a buyer’s panic, with food and whisky jumping rapidly in price.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2014 7:07 pm 
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February 24, 1864 Wednesday
Gen Braxton Bragg was charged with the conduct of military operations in the Armies of the Confederacy, thus becoming in effect chief of staff. Bragg, still very controversial, enjoyed Davis’ trust, but his reputation had suffered from his defeat at Missionary Ridge and the constant conflicts with his generals.

President Lincoln approved an act of Congress to compensate every Union master whose slaves enlisted in the Army, the sum not to exceed $300; the volunteer was to become free. The act also increased bounties for volunteers, redefined quota benefits, increased penalties for draft resistance, subjected Negroes to the draft, provided that those who opposed bearing arms for religious reasons should be assigned non-combatant tasks with freedmen or in hospitals, and gave the President authority to call for such men as required. Debate began on recognizing the restored state government of Louisiana.

In northern Georgia, fighting continued at Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, and Rocky Face Ridge or Crow’s Valley during the Federal Demonstration on Dalton. Elsewhere, skirmishing took place at Tippah River and near Canton, Mississippi; and until Feb 29 there was a Federal scout from Camp Mibres, New Mexico Territory.

U.S.S. Nita, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Robert B. Smith, chased blockade runner Nan-Nan ashore in the East Pass of Suwannee River, Florida. The steamer's crew fired her to prevent her falling into Union hands, but part of Nan-Nan's cargo of cotton, thrown overboard during the chase, was recovered.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:37 pm 
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February 25, 1864 Thursday
Federals under Maj Gen J. M. Palmer made their main effort at Buzzard Roost in the Demonstration on Dalton, Georgia. Johnston’s Confederate positions proved too strong for the limited probing attack, and Palmer withdrew his forces to the main lines of the Army of the Cumberland on Feb 26.

An affair occurred near Hudsonville, Mississippi; and a Union scout from Whiteside’s, Tennessee to Stevens’ and Frick’s gaps, Georgia lasted two days.

Maj Gen John C. Breckinridge was assigned to command the Confederate Trans-Allegheny Department or Western Department of Virginia, relieving Maj Gen Samuel Jones.

U.S.S. Roebuck, commanded by Acting Master Sherrill, seized blockade running British sloop Two Brothers in Indian River, Florida, with cargo including salt, liquor, and nails.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2014 7:58 pm 
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February 26, 1864 Friday
Sherman’s troops skirmished near Canton, Mississippi as their withdrawal after the successful Meridian Campaign neared completion. To the north, W. Sooy Smith’s wing of the expedition straggled into Memphis after severe harassment by Forrest. Other fighting flared at Washington and Sulphur Springs, Tennessee. Edward Porter Alexander, CSA, and William Wirt Allen, CSA, were appointed to Brigadier General.

While on night picket duty at Charleston harbor, a boat commanded by Acting Master's Mate William H. Kitching, Jr., from U.S.S. Nipsic, was captured by a Confederate cutter from C.S.S. Palmetto State. The Union boat encountered her captors in a thick fog and was unable to withdraw rapidly enough against the flood tide to escape. Kitching and his five crew members were taken prisoner and confined initially on board C.S.S. Charleston near Fort Sumter.

A memorandum from President Lincoln confirmed his confidence in Gen Benjamin Butler and asked that the controversial general be sustained in his efforts. Lincoln also ordered that the death sentence of all deserters be commuted to imprisonment during the war, thus continuing his policy of leniency ( http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/te ... oln7%3A453 ).

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 6:25 pm 
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February 27, 1864 Saturday
Near Americus, Georgia Federal prisoners of war began arriving at an unfinished prison camp, officially Camp Sumter, but known to history as Andersonville ( http://www.nps.gov/ande/index.htm ). Insufficient food, shelter, clothing, and accommodation soon made the prison notorious.

The Demonstration by Federals on Dalton, Georgia ended with a skirmish at the Stone Church near Catoosa Platform or Station. Skirmishing took place in the Sequatchie Valley, Tennessee; at Madisonville and Sharon, Mississippi; near Poplar Bluff, Missouri; and at Pinos Altos, Arizona Territory. Federals destroyed a large Confederate salt works on Goose Creek near St Marks, Florida.

U.S.S. Roebuck, commanded by Acting Master Sherrill, seized blockade running British sloop Nina with cargo of liquors and coffee, and schooner Rebel with cargo of salt, liquor, and cotton, at Indian River Inlet, Florida.

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1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 6:07 pm 
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February 28, 1864 Sunday
After preliminary planning in Washington a cavalry force of about 3500 men under Judson Kilpatrick ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judson_Kilpatrick ) left the Rapidan River, intent on penetrating weakly held Richmond and releasing Federal prisoners there. With Kilpatrick was Col Ulric Dahlgren ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulric_Dahlgren ), a name soon known to fame. A minor affair at Ely’s Ford marked the beginning of the expedition. As a diversionary support, Brig Gen Custer ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Armstrong_Custer ) began a raid into Albemarle County, Virginia which lasted until March 1.

Other skirmishing occurred at Dukedom, Tennessee; on Pearl River and near Yazoo City, Mississippi; and Federals scouted in Gloucester County, Virginia. Lieutenant General John Bell Hood ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bell_Hood ), CSA, is assigned command of the 2nd Army Corps, Confederate Army of Tennessee.

President Lincoln ordered Adj Gen Lorenzo Thomas to proceed west to resolve the pressing predicament of contraband along the Mississippi River. The plight of the Negroes, the need to restore plantations to usefulness, the problems of cotton and other trading were becoming increasingly urgent and troublesome.

U.S.S. Penobscot, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Andrew E. K. Benham, seized British schooner Lilly attempting to run the blockade at Velasco, Texas, with cargo of powder.

Two boats from U.S.S. Monticello led by Lieutenant William B. Cushing landed at Confederate-held Smithville, North Carolina, at night to attempt the capture of General Louis Hebert. The daring Cushing found his way with three of his men to the General's quarters in the middle of town and within fifty yards of the Confederate barracks. Cushing was disappointed to find that Hebert had gone to Wilmington earlier that day and instead reported to Rear Admiral Lee: "I send Captain Kelly, C.S. Army, to you, deeply regretting that the general was not in when I called."

U.S.S. Penobscot, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Benham, captured blockade running schooner Stingray and John Douglas with cargoes of cotton off Velasco, Texas.

U.S.S. Virginia, commanded by Acting Lieutenant C. H. Brown, captured Confederate schooner Camilla with cargo of cotton off the coast at Galveston, Texas. The sloop Catherine Holt was also captured with cargo of cotton, but she went aground off San Luis Pass and was burned.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 6:09 pm 
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February 29, 1864 Monday
President Lincoln approved the congressional act reviving the grade of lieutenant general. It was clear that Congress and the President had Maj Gen Ulysses S. Grant in mind for this promotion, highest rank in the Army since Washington. Retired Gen Winfield Scott was lieutenant general by brevet only.

Kilpatrick’s cavalry pushed south from the Rapidan River, skirmishing at Beaver Dam Station near Taylorsville. Kilpatrick split his command, sending a detachment of five hundred men toward Goochland Court House under Col Ulric Dahlgren, while he kept the main force with him. By evening the Confederates at Richmond were aware of an impending raid and were taking steps to resist.

Elsewhere, fighting broke out on Redwood Creek, California; near Canton, Mississippi; and at Ballahock on Bear Quarter Road and at Deep Creek, Virginia. In West Virginia Federal troops operated until March 5 against Petersburg and destroyed saltpeter works near Franklin. Cavalry under Custer fought skirmishes at Stanardsville and Charlottesville on their raid into Albermarle County, Virginia. In Missouri a two-week Federal expedition moved from Rolla, Missouri to Batesville, Arkansas. Hiram Bronson Granbury, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

Prior to the launching of the Red River campaign, Rear Admiral Porter ordered a naval reconnaissance expedition under Lieutenant Commander Ramsay to ascend the Black and Ouachita Rivers, Louisiana. The force included paddle wheel monitor U.S.S. Osage and gunboats Ouachita, Lexington, Fort Hindman, Conestoga, and Cricket. Ramsay moved up the Black River and met with no resistance until late in the afternoon, 1 March, when Confederate sharpshooters took his ships under fire below Trinity. The gunboats countered with a hail of grape, canister, and shrapnel and steamed above the city before anchoring for the night. Next day Ramsay's vessels entered the Ouachita River and Osage, commanded by Acting Master Thomas Wright, suffered a casualty which disabled her turret. Below Harrisonburg, Louisiana, which the naval force shelled on 2 March, Confederate troops again opened fire on the naval force, centering their attention on Fort Hindman, which took 27 hits. One of them disabled Fort Hindman's starboard engine and Ramsay dropped her back, transferring to Ouachita. She took 3 hits but suffered no serious damage, and the gunboats silenced the Southern fire ashore. Ramsay proceeded as far as Catahoula Shoals and Bayou Louis without further incident. "I found plenty of water to enable me to proceed to Monroe," Ramsay reported, "but the water was falling so fast I deemed it best to return." The gunboats returned to the mouth of the Red River on 5 March after spending the 3rd and 4th landing at various places and capturing field pieces and cotton, briefly engaging Confederate troops once more.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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