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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2021 6:37 pm 
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Think Gettysburg would have played out differently?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2021 9:02 pm 
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MAJ Stewart - -

Believe that is one of the most heavily debated questions of "What if" in the Civil War. IMHO, had Jackson been at Gettysburg, the CSA II Corps would have pushed harder in the North of the battlefield, and after driving the Union forces out of the town of Gettysburg, could possibly even have pushed the Union forces off of Culp's hill. Then it would have been a matter of Meade's nerve. Having lost Culp's Hill, would he have initiated a major retreat during the night of July 1st ???

Interesting debate!

Josef Seidl, BGEN, CSA
Commanding Stuart's Cavalry (4th Div / I Corps)
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2021 9:39 pm 
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I think you may be right, I just re watched the old Gettysburg movie (killer angels). When gen. Trimble complained about Gen Ewell, not pushing for the hill..... made me think about it .......

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2021 9:49 pm 
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Major Stewart, sir.
I'm posting a link to a podcast that is hosted by two licensed battlefield guides that address this exact subject. It is definitely worth a listen.
https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0c ... U2OTRlOTg1

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Col. Jason "Skedaddle" Campbell
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2021 9:30 am 
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warhorse123 wrote:
Major Stewart, sir.
I'm posting a link to a podcast that is hosted by two licensed battlefield guides that address this exact subject. It is definitely worth a listen.
https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0c ... U2OTRlOTg1



Now that was a very good listen!! There is alot of good information in that pod cast, not just a lot of "what if's". Really is amazing the wounds these officers would take and return to service. It was,if not common, then certainly not uncommon, for an officer to lose a limb and return to command. Simply amazing. Everyone knows of Gen Hood ofcourse, being tied to his saddle in battle, i cant help but wonder how that would affect the leadership of an officer. Was this common among northern officers as well??

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2021 11:17 am 
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William Stewart wrote:
warhorse123 wrote:
Major Stewart, sir.
I'm posting a link to a podcast that is hosted by two licensed battlefield guides that address this exact subject. It is definitely worth a listen.
https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0c ... U2OTRlOTg1



Now that was a very good listen!! There is alot of good information in that pod cast, not just a lot of "what if's". Really is amazing the wounds these officers would take and return to service. It was,if not common, then certainly not uncommon, for an officer to lose a limb and return to command. Simply amazing. Everyone knows of Gen Hood ofcourse, being tied to his saddle in battle, i cant help but wonder how that would affect the leadership of an officer. Was this common among northern officers as well??


I know General O. O. Howard was missing an arm and General William F Bartlett was captured at The Crater after his cork prosthetic leg was shot away. Confederate General Ewell was shot in his prosthetic leg at Gettysburg as well. These just off the top of my head.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2021 11:53 pm 
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Found this on youtube and remembered it was a topic of discussion here in the tavern.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldr7N_2gsLU

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 07, 2021 10:07 am 
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All of these fantasies are just that, fantasies.
In the first place Jackson lost his arm May 2.
Hood's arm was injured at Gettysburg, not amputated and he did not return to duty until September, nearly two months later.
Otis Howard lost an arm at Fair Oaks on June 1 and didn't return to duty until September three months later.
The odds of Jackson being ready to march north with Lee the first week of June are slim.

Several sources I've read indicate Lee had considered creating a third corps even before Jackson's death.
So even if Jackson survives it's probable he would have commanded only Ewell's II Corps force.
Since Ewell was senior he would probably have been given the III Corps.
Question now becomes does Gettysburg even happen. With these changes the division commands are different.

Finally all this business of England ever supporting the Confederacy is a fantasy.
Once the Emancipation Proclamation was issued and in force it became a war against slavery and England had abolished slavery 30 years earlier and had sent warships to halt the African slave trade.
As much as Napoleon III would have liked to support the Confederacy he would not do so without England going along with him and it's unlikely any government in England could have survived supporting it.

If you would like to see more on the Jackson survival subject try this link.

https://generalmeadesociety.org/research-articles/

You'll find a link to a pdf download WOULD STONEWALL HAVE EVEN BEEN THERE? covering this very subject from several angles.

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